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21 random facts about ‘jaws’.

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"Jaws" opened on June 20, 1975, and broke box-office records

The film launched director Steven Spielberg's career

It should have been a waterlogged disaster.

The shoot ran too long and over budget, the script was still being written as scenes were filmed, the young director woke up every day fearing he would get fired, and the mechanical shark built for the movie sank to the bottom of the ocean.

And yet, 40 years ago this summer, people lined up around the block and around the world to get scared silly by “Jaws,” widely seen as the first summer blockbuster.

A horror story wrapped in an adventure, the movie tapped into our deepest fears about what dangers lurk beneath the ocean’s surface. Some people told screenwriter Carl Gottlieb that the movie, about a giant shark terrorizing a summer resort town, even made them afraid to venture into swimming pools.

Yes, the fake shark looks a little cheesy now. But in 1975, long before computers could create any spectacle onscreen, it was plenty terrifying.

70 historic moments from the 1970s

The movie overcame a troubled shoot to launch Steven Spielberg’s career as a master craftsman of popular entertainments. With its wide release and aggressive ad campaign, it also pioneered the current Hollywood model for how big-budget movies are springboarded into the market.

the seventies summer blockbuster movies jaws star wars orig_00004116.jpg

Was 'Jaws' the ultimate summer blockbuster?

And it sparked a cultural fascination with sharks – especially great whites – that endures today in everything from IMAX documentaries to the “Sharknado” movies to the Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week.

The original “Jaws” returned to select theaters nationwide on June 21 and 24 , giving today’s moviegoers a rare chance to see it on the big screen. Which means that 40 years later, it’s still not safe to go back in the water.

Here’s a roundup of 21 salient and strange facts about the movie.

1. Spielberg, whose first film, “Duel,” was about a highway motorist being menaced by a mysterious tanker truck, was afraid of being typecast if he took the “Jaws” job. “Who wants to be known as a shark-and-truck director?” he complained.

2. None of the three main actors – Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw and Richard Dreyfuss – was the producers’ first choice for the parts. Robert Duvall and Charlton Heston were among those considered for Chief Brody, while Lee Marvin and Sterling Hayden were initially sought for Captain Quint, and Jeff Bridges was discussed for Matt Hooper, the marine biologist.

3. The movie’s script eliminated several subplots from Peter Benchley’s novel that Spielberg considered distracting, including an affair between Chief Brody’s wife, Ellen, and Hooper (Dreyfuss).

4. Location scouts considered filming locales across the United States but chose Martha’s Vineyard because they needed a summer beach resort town with a sheltered bay, manageable tides and shallow waters to make filming easier.

Defining moments in ’70s television

5. Although the movie is set in midsummer, producers began filming in early May 1974 to avoid an actors’ strike that was scheduled to begin July 1. If you look closely in the background of some scenes, you can see trees with no leaves.

6. The movie’s 25-foot great white shark was played by three full-scale mechanical models towed by submerged “sleds” or guided by hidden scuba divers. The crew nicknamed the shark “Bruce” after Spielberg’s lawyer, Bruce Ramer.

7. Spielberg, frustrated by the shark’s frequent malfunctions, had another name for it: “the great white turd.”

The movie triggered a wave of interest in great white sharks -- this one is leaping out of the water to bite a decoy seal --  and other predatory sea creatures. The Discovery Channel's long-running

8. British actor Shaw was so concerned about owing taxes to the IRS on his income that he flew to Bermuda or Canada on almost all his days off to limit his work hours in the United States.

9. The grieving mother who slapped Chief Brody in the movie was played by actress Lee Fierro. She had a difficult time faking the slap and instead walloped Scheider over and over during the many takes needed to get the scene right.

10. At one point, Quint’s boat, the Orca, sank unexpectedly during filming, soaking cameras and threatening to ruin the day’s completed footage. The waterlogged film was flown to a lab in New York, where technicians were able to save it.

11. When composer John Williams first played his ominous two-note “shark theme” score for Spielberg on a piano, the director thought it was a joke. Later Spielberg would say, “The score was clearly responsible for half of the success of that movie.”

12. Local fishermen were unable to catch a big enough shark to use in the scene in which town officials prematurely celebrate a large shark that’s been caught and strung up on a dock. So the film’s producers located a freshly caught 13-foot tiger shark in Florida and flew it up to Massachusetts on a private plane. By the time the cameras rolled, however, the shark was decomposing and smelled awful.

Quiz: Who were you in the ’70s?

13. The movie’s protracted shoot was so troubled by mishaps that some crew members privately began calling the film “Flaws.”

14. Brody’s famous line upon first encountering the shark, “We’re gonna need a bigger boat,” was ad-libbed by Scheider. At test screenings, the audience’s screams drowned out the line, so Spielberg re-edited the scene to make it more audible.

15. A young filmmaker named John Landis was visiting the set when he was pressed into duty to help build the rickety wooden pier used in the scene where two men try to catch the shark with a hook and chain, baited with a roast. Landis went on to direct “Animal House” and “An American Werewolf in London.”

The success of

16. For the famous scene in which Quint recounts the sinking of the USS Indianapolis, Shaw persuaded Spielberg to let him have a few drinks before the cameras started rolling. But Shaw got so drunk, he had to be carried to the set and couldn’t get through his lines. He later called Spielberg and apologized; they shot the scene again the next day, and Shaw nailed it.

17. To add authenticity to the scene in which Hooper goes underwater in the shark cage, a second unit shot footage of real sharks in Australia. To make the sharks appear bigger, the filmmakers used a shrunken shark cage and a Hooper stunt double played by a 4-foot-9 ex-jockey in a wetsuit.

18. The original script, like the novel, called for Hooper to be killed when the shark bites through the cage. But the Australia crew had captured spectacular footage of a great white attacking an empty shark cage, and Spielberg wanted to use it. So the scene was rewritten to let Hooper escape, sparing Dreyfuss’ character.

Could there be any scarier way to watch ‘Jaws’ than this?

19. After principal filming wrapped, Spielberg decided he needed one more big scare. He wasn’t satisfied with the scene in which Hooper investigates a fisherman’s sunken boat and is jolted when the man’s disembodied head floats out of the hull. So Spielberg recruited a small crew and reshot the scene in film editor Verna Fields’ backyard swimming pool in Encino, California. To make the clear, chlorinated water match the murkier look of the ocean, crew members poured a gallon of milk into the pool.

20. Test screenings revealed that the audience’s loudest screams were for the severed-head scene – even louder than when the shark first rises out of the water behind Brody. After the movie opened, Spielberg and screenwriter Gottlieb would sneak into screenings in Los Angeles and stand in the back of the theater “just to watch the sold-out audience visibly rise out of their seats with a collective shriek.”

21. John Williams conducted the orchestra during the 1976 Academy Awards, so when he won the Oscar for best score, he had to dash up to the podium to accept his Oscar and then run back down to continue conducting.

Sources: “ The Jaws Log ,” by Carl Gottlieb; Ain’t it Cool News; IMDb.

Decades later, the influence of

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20 Things You Didn't Know About 'Jaws'

We'll need a bigger boat to hold all the amazing trivia about the original summer movie blockbuster.

by Tracey Minkin, AARP , June 17, 2020

Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw in a scene from the film Jaws

AF archive/Alamy Stock Photo

What got you? The terrifying poster? That two-note theme music? The shot of that poor girl's legs from the shark's point of view? All of the above?

Forty-five years ago this weekend, Jaws — the world's first summer blockbuster — hit America's movie screens and quickly became the highest grossing film of all time (for a while). Who doesn't think, when scanning the ocean before a dip, that unforgettable line: “Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water ..."

But did you know that that famous tagline — one of the most famous, in fact, in film — is actually not from the first film, but the sequel ( Jaws 2 ) that came out three years later? Read on for 20 more fantastic trivia tidbits from one of America's most unforgettable films.

1. Jaws wasn't even supposed to come out in the summer

It's hard to separate Steven Spielberg's brilliant adaptation of Peter Benchley's novel without thinking of it as a summer movie. While the film hit theaters on June 20, 1975, starring Roy Scheider as police chief Martin Brody, Robert Shaw as shark fisherman Quint, and  Richard Dreyfuss  as oceanographer Matt Hooper, it was originally planned for a Christmas 1974 release. Lengthy shooting delays (you try getting mechanical sharks to work and the weather to cooperate at the same time) made that goal impossible.

2. Martha's Vineyard played the role of Amity Island ... because of a storm

Most fans know that the famed New England island, with its deep offshore waters and sandy beaches, was the real-life version of novelist Peter Benchley's fictional Amity Island from the book. What they might not know is that the location scout planned to check out nearby Nantucket Island instead, but stormy weather forced his ferry to Martha's Vineyard, where he discovered the many natural features that lured the production there.

The movie poster for the 1975 film Jaws

Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images

3. The iconic poster wasn't created for the film

The image of a girl swimming naively across the top of the water while a massive great white surges toward her from below was actually purloined from an illustration by artist Roger Kastel for the novel's paperback edition. (Kastel based the big fish on a great white diorama at the American Museum of Natural History, and the swimmer was modeled after a woman whom Kastel had sketched for an ad in  Good Housekeeping . The story goes that he asked her to perch on a stool and pretend to swim to get the pose just right.)

4. The slate had teeth

The slate — also known as “sticks,” “clapperboard” or “clapboard” — is the well-known tablet with a hinged top that gets clapped down to mark the beginning of a film scene (markings on the tablet help editors synch the film and sound). For  Jaws , though, the normally flat edges were replaced with a sharp set of teeth — uppers and lowers.

5. The shark is surprisingly camera shy

The story's nemesis — a great white shark that attacks and terrorizes the fictional community of Amity Island — doesn't appear on screen until one hour and 21 minutes into the two-hour movie.

A behind the scenes look at Jaws

Courtesy Everett Collection

6. The shark was named Bruce

Most  Jaws  aficionados might already know that the three different versions of the 1.2-ton, mechanically powered predator created for the film (this was long before computer-generated imagery, or CGI, remember) were all nicknamed “Bruce” by Spielberg after his lawyer, Bruce Ramer. But how many fans know that the other thing the crew was known to call the faux Carcharodon carcharias (and the huge and breakdown-prone rig that made it work) was “that sonofabitchin’ bastard rig,” according to Carl Gottleib, 82, who wrote the final version of the screenplay during filming, played a small role in the movie, and wrote  The Jaws Log , which director Rod Lurie calls “easily the greatest ‘making-of’ book ever written."

7. George Lucas got his head stuck in Bruce's mouth

Before filming began on Martha's Vineyard, Spielberg invited industry friends (including  Martin Scorsese , George Lucas and screenwriter John Milius) to check out the mechanical shark in development. When Lucas playfully stuck his head in the shark's mouth, Milius and Spielberg grabbed the controls and clamped the jaw shut. And it stuck, trapping the rising-star director. After prying Lucas loose, the guys snuck out of the workshop, afraid they'd broken the contraption.

8. A real shark shown in the movie, caught and hung up on the dock, came all the way from Florida

Needing a big shark that the townspeople could believe might have been the perp behind the early attacks in the film, the crew was under pressure to catch one off the location shoot on Martha's Vineyard. But nothing turned up that was big enough. Turns out the closest area where sharks big enough to pass might be catchable was all the way down in Florida. The production sent two fellows down to arrange things with local fishermen, and lo and behold, they landed a big shark. Trouble was, now they had to get it back to New England before its flesh began rotting. Packaged up in its own crate with as much ice as possible, the fish flew on a private jet and was hauled out to the location and hung up for the scene. But shooting takes time, and the poor carcass was getting fouler and fouler as the days piled up. Watch the faces of some of the actors doing scenes right next to it for a clue to how much the whole business stunk.

Actor Robert Shaw in front of a chalkboard showing a drawing of a shark eating a person

9. Robert Shaw was shot at when he got to Martha's Vineyard

The marvelous playwright/actor had just arrived with his wife, Mary Ure, and their elegant manservant, Eric Harrison, to Martha's Vineyard to begin filming. Imagine their shock late that first night when a local eccentric fired a few rifle bullets through the front door of the rental house, which penetrated walls and even chipped tiles in a downstairs bath. The bullets weren't meant for the star, however — the local thought the place was empty. And all credit to Harrison, who was the first out the door in robe and slippers, examined the fresh bullet holes in the door, proclaiming, “I believe they're shooting, sir.” The rifleman was later fined and released.

10. Peter Benchley scored a cameo in the film

Having worked as a reporter for the  Washington Post  before writing the novel that would become a massive best seller the very summer Spielberg was filming the movie version, Benchley brought work history to his cameo as a TV reporter in the film's pivotal 4th of July Weekend beach panic scene.

11. Benchley bonded with Spielberg and company over booze and cards

While the author and the budding auteur had a little static at first over some comments Spielberg had made about Benchley's original screenplay for the film, the two quickly made up once they met and enjoyed cocktails and rounds of poker at the beach house the director was renting during the project.

Director Steven Spielberg on the set of Jaws

Universal/Getty Images

Director Steven Spielberg on the set of "Jaws."

12. Steven Spielberg “appears” two times in his own movie

No Alfred Hitchcock, who famously appears in “there he is!” cameos in his own films, the young director shows up in  Jaws  in two arcane — and only audible — places. One: His voice crackles over the radio of Quint's boat, the Orca, as the Amity Island dispatcher that patches Brody through to his wife when the chief is out with Quint and Hooper. Two: For a scene including a local band marching through town on the 4th of July, famed composer John Williams was afraid to ask his professional orchestra to sound ... well, amateur. But Spielberg had already professed his love of playing clarinet in his high school band to Williams, and that was just the amateur touch the soundtrack needed. Spielberg picked up the clarinet again, played a Sousa march with Williams's orchestra, and several perfectly flawed bars made it into the final cut.

13. Steven Spielberg's dogs appear in his movie

Police chief Brody's dogs are played by the director's cocker spaniels, Elmer and Zalman.

14. A lot went into making that first shark attack terrifying

Who can forget the shark's first victim, the poor girl who gets dragged back and forth in the water? To get that violent action to look real, Spielberg rigged underwater cables to literally drag actor Susan Backlinie turbulently through the water. (Further, the actor wasn't warned when the jerking would begin, so her onscreen surprise is genuine.) To get the sound of her drowning to add to the audio postproduction, Backlinie was placed in front of a microphone with her head turned up to the ceiling and water was poured down her throat from above.

15. The “real” Quint ends up owning the movie's biggest scare

A Martha's Vineyard local named Craig Kingsbury — a true salt — was the inspiration for much of Robert Shaw's style as Quint (including his improvised ramblings). Not only did Kingsbury end up with a small role as another local fisherman in the film (named Ben Gardner), but his disembodied head pops out of a sunken porthole in what's largely considered the movie's biggest scare.

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16. That scary moment was filmed in a swimming pool in the editor's backyard

Looking for the ultimate scare, Spielberg had already done extra filming of the discovery of the head by Richard Dreyfuss's character in a special tank back on the mainland after location filming wrapped. But he wasn't happy with it, so his legendary editor Verna Fields offered up her backyard swimming pool as a place to reshoot the scene (they poured a gallon of milk from Verna's refrigerator into the pool water to make it look more like the real ocean). If you've seen the movie, you know this take was one for the record books (and for the record books, that's a latex recreation of Kingsbury's head).

17. The location crew formed its own Jaws softball team

As an antidote to the rigors of location work, the crew formed a softball team and on Sundays took on locals.

18. Post- Jaws  hysteria wasn't a publicity stunt

We were afraid to go back in the water, and sometimes things got out of hand. One Southern California beach had to be cleared by lifeguards because of a shark-sighting panic. Turns out it was dolphins. On a more serious note, the idea of a vengeful rogue shark (a fictional creation) spurred a national fervor of fear, a drop in beach tourism, and a rise in shark killings. It has taken decades of science and activism to help post- Jaws  generations understand and respect the role sharks play in the oceans and the ecosystem overall.

19. Spielberg had nightmares later, too

While a generation of beachgoers emerged from the blockbuster film forever creeped out about swimming in ocean deeps, the director himself had nightmares for months after shooting wrapped. His dreams, though, weren't of shark attacks, but of still being in charge of the shoot. He'd awaken thinking he was still on Martha's Vineyard, riddled with anxiety and panic.

20. No one wrote the movie's most famous line

"You're gonna need a bigger boat,” uttered unforgettably by Roy Scheider, was improvised by the actor on the day of shooting.

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25 Incisive Facts About 'Jaws'

Sean Hutchinson

Daah dun, daah dun, daah dun, dun dun, dun dun, dun dun. On June 20, 1975, Steven Spielberg’s Jaws —the original summer blockbuster —arrived in theaters and scared moviegoers out of the water. Here are 25 things you might not have known about the Oscar-winning shark flick.

1. Peter Benchley's book Jaws could have been called something else.

Jaws is adapted from author Peter Benchley’s bestselling novel of the same name, which Benchley based on a series of shark attacks that occurred off the coast of New Jersey in 1916 and after an incident where a New York fisherman named Frank Mundus caught a 4500-pound shark off the coast of Montauk in 1964. Other title ideas Benchley had before settling on Jaws were “The Stillness in the Water,” “The Silence of the Deep,” “Leviathan Rising,” and “The Jaws of Death."

2. Peter Benchley makes a cameo in Jaws .

Peter Benchley makes a cameo in Jaws (1975).

Benchley himself can be seen in a cameo in the film as the news reporter who addresses the camera on the beach. Benchley had previously worked as a news reporter for The Washington Post before penning Jaws .

Steven Spielberg also makes a cameo in the movie: His voice is the Amity Island dispatcher who calls Quint’s boat, the Orca , with Sheriff Brody’s wife on the line.

3. Steven Spielberg got the directing job on Jaws because of Duel .

Spielberg was chosen to direct Jaws by producers Richard Zanuck and David Brown (who had also worked with the then-28-year-old director on his 1974 film The Sugarland Express ) because of his film Duel , which featured a maniacal trucker terrorizing a mild-mannered driver. The producers thought the movie was thematically similar to the story for Jaws , making Spielberg a great fit.

4. There aren't a lot of "jaws" in Jaws .

The shark doesn’t fully appear in a shot until 1 hour and 21 minutes into the two-hour film. The reason it isn’t shown is because the mechanical shark that was built rarely worked during filming, so Spielberg had to create inventive ways (like Quint’s yellow barrels) to shoot around the non-functional shark.

5. The film took a very long time to make.

Jaws was marred with so many technical problems (including the shark not working and shooting in the Atlantic Ocean) that the originally scheduled 65-day shoot ballooned into 159 days, not counting post-production.

6. Jaws 's Amity Island was actually Martha's Vineyard.

To create the fictional town of Amity, the production shot on location in Edgartown and Menemsha on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. Strict land ordinances kept the production from building anywhere—Quint’s shack was the one and only set built for the movie, while the defaced Amity Island billboard had to be constructed and taken down all in one day.

7. The shark in Jaws weighed more than a ton.

Roy Scheider in Steven Spielberg's Jaws (1975).

The pneumatically-powered shark, designed and built by production designer Joe Alves , weighed in at 1.2 tons and measured 25 feet in length. Part of the reason that Martha’s Vineyard was chosen as a location was because the surrounding ocean bed had a depth of 35 feet for up to 12 miles offshore, which was perfect for scenes that required the mechanical shark rig to be rested on the shallow ocean floor.

8. Steven Spielberg took inspiration for Jaws from his legal counsel.

The director nicknamed the shark “Bruce” after his lawyer, Bruce Ramer, who has represented other celebrities like George Clooney, Robert Zemeckis, and Clint Eastwood.

9. Some good, old-fashioned elbow grease helped create Jaws 's opening scene.

The opening scene took three days to shoot. To achieve the jolting motions of the shark attacking the swimmer in the opening sequence, a harness with cables was attached to actress Susan Backlinie’s legs and was pulled by crewmembers back and forth along the shoreline. Spielberg told the crew not to let Backlinie know when she would be yanked back and forth, so her terrified reaction is genuine.

Spielberg went on to spoof his own opening scene for Jaws in his 1979 World War II comedy 1941 . The scene features Backlinie once again taking a skinny dip at the beach, but instead of being attacked by a shark she’s scooped up by a passing Japanese submarine.

10. Roy Scheider landed the lead role in Jaws with a little bit of eavesdropping.

Scheider got the part of Chief Martin Brody after overhearing Spielberg talking to a friend at a Hollywood party about the scene where the shark leaps out of the water and onto Quint’s boat. Scheider was instantly enthralled, and asked Spielberg if he could be in the film. Spielberg loved Scheider from his role in The French Connection , and later offered the actor the part.

11. Richard Dreyfuss wasn't the first choice to play Hooper in Jaws .

Spielberg initially approached Jon Voight, Timothy Bottoms, and Jeff Bridges to play oceanographer Matt Hooper. When none of them could commit to the role, Spielberg’s friend George Lucas suggested Richard Dreyfuss, whom Lucas had directed in American Graffiti . Dreyfuss would later accept the part because he thought he was terrible in the title role of the film The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz a year earlier.

12. Robert Shaw wasn't the first choice to play Quint in Jaws .

When actors Lee Marvin and Sterling Hayden—the first and second choices to play the grizzled fisherman Quint, respectively—both turned Spielberg down, producers Zanuck and Brown recommended English actor Robert Shaw, whom they had previously worked with on 1973's The Sting .

13. A Martha's Vineyard fisherman was the real Quint.

Shaw based his performance of Quint on Martha’s Vineyard native and fisherman Craig Kingsbury , a non-actor who appears in the film as Ben Gardner. Kingsbury helped Shaw with his accent and allegedly told Shaw old sea stories that the actor incorporated into his improvised dialogue as Quint.

14. Gregory Peck forced a scene to be cut from Jaws .

In early drafts of the screenplay, Quint was originally introduced while causing a disturbance in a movie theater while watching John Huston’s 1958 adaptation of Moby Dick . The scene was shot, but actor Gregory Peck—who plays Captain Ahab in that movie—owned the rights to the film version of Moby Dick and wouldn’t let the filmmakers on Jaws use the footage, so the sequence was cut.

15. The book version of Jaws was very different from the movie.

Early drafts of the screenplay featured a subplot where Hooper has an affair with Chief Brody’s wife, which was carted over from the book . Another detail left out of the movie from the book was that Mayor Vaughn was under pressure from the mafia, not local business owners, to keep Amity’s beaches open because of their real estate investments on the island.

16. Steven Spielberg added an offscreen improv moment to Jaws .

The scene where Brody’s son Sean mimics his father’s movements at the dinner table was based on a real thing that happened between Scheider and child actor Jay Mello in between takes. Spielberg loved the off-the-cuff moment so much that he re-staged it and put it in the movie.

Another iconic moment was also a spontaneous one: Brody’s famous “You’re gonna need a bigger boat” line was entirely improvised by Scheider on the day of shooting—and based on an inside joke within the production.

17. Robert Shaw put his own spin on the U.S.S. Indianapolis speech.

Quint’s U.S.S. Indianapolis speech wasn’t in the novel, and the backstory of Quint being a sailor on the ship first appeared in an uncredited rewrite of the script by playwright Howard Sackler. Later, writer-director (and Spielberg’s friend) John Milius expanded the characteristic into a multi-page monologue, which was then whittled down and spruced up by actor Robert Shaw (himself a playwright) on the day of shooting.

18. Some of what you see in Jaws is real shark footage.

Zanuck demanded that real shark footage be used in the movie, and Spielberg used it sparingly. He hired experts Ron and Valerie Taylor to shoot underwater footage of 14-foot sharks off the coast of Australia. For scale, they hired a little person actor named Carl Rizzo to appear as Hooper in a mini shark cage in hopes that they could create the illusion of a shark attacking the character. After trying to get the right shot for about a week, the sharks would only swim around the cage. Then, during a take when Rizzo wasn’t in the cage, a shark became entangled in the cage’s bridle, causing the fish to thrash and roll around. This footage was included in the final film.

19. Despite all the bloody shark attacks in Jaws , the movie is rated PG.

Jaws was initially rated R by the MPAA. But after some of the more gruesome frames of the shot showing the severed leg of the man attacked by the shark in the estuary were trimmed down, the film was given a PG-rating (the PG-13-rating wasn’t created until after Spielberg’s own film, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom , caused the MPAA to change the system in 1984). The poster for the film still reads that the movie “MAY BE TOO INTENSE FOR YOUNGER CHILDREN.”

20. Steven Spielberg didn't direct some of Jaws 's final scenes.

Spielberg didn’t direct the shot of the shark exploding. In fact, he had already returned to Los Angeles to begin post-production on the film after the grueling shooting schedule and left the shot up to the production’s second unit.

21. Jaws 's poster image came about by chance.

The film’s iconic poster image was designed by artist Roger Kastel for the paperback edition of Benchley’s book. Kastel modeled the image of the massive shark emerging from the bottom of the frame after a great white shark diorama at the American Museum of Natural History. The female swimmer at the top was actually a model that Kastel was sketching at his studio for an ad in Good Housekeeping . He asked her to stay an extra half-hour and had her pose for the image by standing on a stool and pretending to swim.

22. Jaws was the biggest hit Hollywood had ever seen.

Jaws was the first movie released in more than 400 theaters in the United States, and the first movie to gross over $100 million at the box office. It was the highest grossing movie of all time until Star Wars was released two years later.

23. Steven Spielberg included a nod to his previous movie in Jaws .

The faint roaring sound that is heard after the shark is blown up was also used by Spielberg in Duel , when that film’s villainous truck falls off a cliff.

24. Jaws originally ended with a nod to Moby-Dick .

The original ending in the script had the shark dying of harpoon injuries inflicted by Quint and Brody in an homage to the crew of the Pequod , but Spielberg thought the movie needed a crowd-pleasing finale and came up with the exploding tank as seen in the final film. The dialogue and foreshadowing of the tank were then dropped in as they shot the movie.

25. Jaws 's main theme music is easy to play.

The sole music notes played for composer John Williams’s Jaws theme are E and F. Jaws marked the second time Williams worked with Spielberg after his film The Sugarland Express , and Williams has composed the music for every Spielberg movie since with the exception of 1985's The Color Purple and 2015's Bridge of Spies .

Additional Sources: Blu-ray special features

A version of this article was originally published in 2018 and has been updated for 2022.

The Daily Jaws

45 Mindblowing Facts About Jaws

It should have been a waterlogged disaster.

The shoot ran too long and over budget, the script was still being written as scenes were filmed, the young director woke up every day fearing he would get fired, and the mechanical shark built for the movie sank to the bottom of the ocean.

And yet, 45 years ago this summer, people lined up around the block and around the world to get scared silly by "Jaws," widely seen as the first summer blockbuster.

Here are 45 amazing facts about Steven Spielberg’s shark thriller you really need to know!

Steven Spielberg was not the first director Jaws was assigned to, that was Dick Richards. He kept on referring to the shark as the whale, so was let go.

Originally, the studio was hoping to train a real shark for the film.

Jaws was originally planned to be released for Christmas 1974.

The Brody's dog in Jaws, is Elmer and was Steven Spielberg's dog.

Jaws Author, Peter Benchley, had a cameo in the film as a news reporter on the beach.

Bruce the mechanical shark was named after Steven Spielberg's lawyer, Bruce Ramer.

The original shooting schedule for Jaws was 58 days, it ballooned to 159.

Jaws was nominated for four Oscars. It won three in the categories of best music, sound and editing. It didn't win for Best picture.

When composer John Williams first played Steven Spielberg the simple E-F-E-F Jaws motif on the piano, Spielberg thought that he was kidding him. He wasn’t. It continues to be famous in swimming pools worldwide.

The Jaws score was recorded in March 1975 with a 73 peice orchestra.

It’s estimated that an astonishing 67 million Americans saw it upon release.

It took just 38 days for Jaws to swim past the magic $100 million barrier.

When is a film about a shark not a film about a shark? When said shark only has four minutes screen time.

The Ben Gardner head scene was a late addition to the film and was shot in editor, Verna Fields' swimming pool.

The fictional town of Amity Island was Martha's Vineyard.

As extras, Martha’s Vineyard residents were paid $64 each for running up and down the beach during the shark attack scene.

The Orca was a converted Nova Scotia fishing boat called the ‘Warlock’.

To make the Orca look like it had exposed to the elements, the SFX team painted seagull poop all over it

Lee Fierro (Mrs Kintner) was the local drama teacher on Marthas Vineyard

The scene at the dinner table between Brody and Hooper featured real red wine. usually movies use red grape juice. This was a prank by prop master Bill Patrotta. Roy and Richard didn’t say a word and got drunk for real shooting the scene to Steven Spielberg’s bemusement.

Quint’s limerick about Mary Lee was improvised by Robert Shaw after seeing it on a gravestone in England.

The shark’s teeth were mostly elastomer - hard teeth for biting things and soft ones for biting people.

The crew became so frustrated with the constant set backs making the movie, they referred to the film as FLAWS.

The children splashing in the water just before the Alex Kintner attack are karate chopping the water - the same children that allegedly karate chopped some local picket fences.

Joe Alves was knocked out by Roy Scheider when he was stabbing some styrofoam (in place of the shark during the final battle)

Producers David Brown & Richard Zanuck paid Jaws novelist Peter Benchley $175,000 for the movie rights to his book - before it had been published!

The character of Quint was originally to be introduced laughing while watching Moby Dick in a theatre.

Star Wars director George Lucas suggested Richard Dreyfuss for the part of Hooper having worked with him on American Graffiti.

The 2 actors who played the boys that pulled the cardboard fin prank are brothers in real life.

An American Werewolf in London director John Landis helped set up the jetty/holiday roast scene.

Horror writer Stephen King declared in a tweet that “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.” is the best line in movie history.

Steven Spielberg makes an uncredited appearance as the voice of the Amity Point Coastguard.

The medical inspector / coroner is played by Martha’s Vineyard’s then real life doctor Robert Nevin.

Jonathan Filley, who plays Chrissie’s date Cassidy, worked again with Steven Spielberg as a production manager on War Of The Worlds (2005).

In 2001, Jaws was named as culturally significant by the library of congress and selected for preservation on the national film registry.

Jaws’ editor Verna Fields was affectionately called ‘Mother Cutter’ by the cast and crew as she cut the movie and cooked them great food.

Steven Spielberg kept Ben Gardner’s head in his office until he was eventually persuaded to give it up to Universal Studios.

The number plate pulled from the Tiger shark’s stomach (007 0 981) is also seen in Deep Blue Sea (1999) and In Ralph Breaks The Internet (2018).

Lorraine Gary (Ellen Brody) was the first actor casted the movie.

The Jaws poster was designed by Roger Kastel, he would go on to design the Gone With The Wind-style poster for The Empire Strikes Back.

Actors Sterling Hayden and Lee Marvin were first choices to play Quint.

Steven Spielberg didn’t direct the shark exploding - he had already left the island and was on his way back to Los Angeles.

The faint roaring sound that is heard after the shark is blown up was also used by Spielberg in Duel , when that film’s villainous truck falls off a cliff.

Although the movie is set in midsummer, producers began filming in early May 1974 to avoid an actors' strike that was scheduled to begin July 1. If you look closely in the background of some scenes, you can see trees with no leaves.

Spielberg, frustrated by the shark's frequent malfunctions, had another name for it: "the great white turd."

What’s your favourite Jaws factoid?

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12 Jaws Behind-The-Scenes Facts You Might Not Know

Jaws Poster

Earlier this year, Jaws celebrated its 45th anniversary . Once meant to be a simple man vs. shark movie based on a paperback novel, this early Steven Spielberg movie became the highest grossing film of all-time (before Star Wars , at least) and it defined the summer movie season as we know it today. It also jumpstarted the career of its young, brightly talented filmmaker, Steven Spielberg, propelling him from up-and-coming hotshot to arguably our most well-known filmmaker outside of Alfred Hitchcock.

While the movie has seen enormous success over the years, the process of making this very famous movie was far from easy. Here are some fun behind-the-scenes facts about the beloved Spielberg blockbuster.

Steven Spielberg Was Initially Hesitant To Make Jaws

During the early days of Jaws , as producers Richard D. Zanuck and David Brown were eager to adapt Peter Benchley's novel to the silver screen, a young 26-year-old Steven Spielberg was adamant to get the job. Having done only TV work, including the TV movie Duel , and one theatrical film, The Sugarland Express , prior, Spielberg was a young-and-hungry filmmaker looking to prove himself.

Through his enthusiasm, he won over the producers. But as the shoot drew nearer, Spielberg's excitement waned. As the BBC reported , he was afraid he'd be typecast "truck and shark director," referring to Duel in addition to Jaws . He set his sights on making Lady Lucky for Fox instead (which was eventually directed by Stanley Donen), but Universal exercised their right to veto this decision. In the end, it was good thing Spielberg stayed on-board. But production wasn't easy.

Richard Dreyfuss Claimed They Started Making Jaws Without A Script, Cast, Or Shark

While Jaws is often celebrated for being a tight, well-constructed movie, filled with ceaseless tension and well-executed scares, the production for the movie was easily among the most troublesome of Spielberg's long career. Whether it was casting delays, script rewrites, troubles with the shark, or a boatload of other problems, Jaws didn't have any easy time making its way to the screen, and Richard Dreyfuss was honest about the difficulties that came with making this classic movie. As he noted at one point , the movie started "without a script, without a cast, and without a shark." Ultimately, a lot of these problems were figured out as the shoot continued, though it was such a problematic production that the crew apparently privately dubbed it "Flaws."

Jaws Is Considered The First Major Movie To Be Shot On The Ocean

One of the biggest reasons why the production of Jaws proved to be so very challenging and troublesome was not merely because the shark wouldn't cooperate (the producers initially wanted a real shark but that proved to be impossible), but because it was apparently the first major movie to be shot on the ocean . Not in the ocean, mind you, but on the ocean. As it was discussed in HBO's documentary, Spielberg , the decision to make the movie a little more realistic by being on the open shores pushed the production back several days (over a 100, in fact) and it caused the film's once-modest budget to skyrocket. Rather than film in a lake or on a set, a young Spielberg was adamant about realism. While it clearly resulted in a pain-in-the-ass shoot, it did help overall.

George Lucas Accidentally Got Stuck Inside The Shark

Even before the movie started rolling, Jaws had a number of problems and mishaps behind the scenes. Humorously, one such incident happened to George Lucas, a longtime friend/colleague of Steven Spielberg. As the fellow filmmaker visited his friend during pre-production on Jaws , Lucas saw some of the troubles the crew faced with the faulty mechanical shark as it was being constructed.

Being a tech fan, Lucas stuck his noggin inside the mechanical contraption to see how it worked. And, as it was noted by the oddly-titled book The Utterly, Completely, and Totally Useless Fact-O-Pedia , Lucas found himself at the center of a prank when Spielberg and John Milius made the jaw clamp shut on poor Lucas' head. Nevertheless, in the midst of these shenanigans, the shark once again malfunctioned and Lucas got stuck inside the shark. Thankfully, the filmmakers were able to get him out.

The Shark Is Named "Bruce" After Steven Spielberg's Lawyer

While casual moviegoers are prone to call the great white shark in Jaws by the movie's title, this isn't the name the mechanical shark was given on set. Indeed, for the labored crew who worked on this troubled production, the shark was known simply as "Bruce," named as Steven Spielberg's lawyer.

As for the reason why, it's not especially clear, but it was quickly adopted. Fans of Spielberg's movie and the ill-fated sequels that it spawned have also taken to calling the shark "Bruce," and the name has stuck around in the decades following the film's release. For instance, in one of several homages to Jaws , Finding Nemo 's primary shark is also named Bruce, seemingly as a tribute to Spielberg's famous film. Currently, Bruce the Shark is currently located in the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures as of earlier this year.

The Line "You're Gonna Need A Bigger Boat" Was Ad-Libbed

Filmmaking is a collaborative process. Some of the most famous movies lines weren't written but rather uttered. "I'm the King of the World" from Titanic , "You can't handle the truth" from A Few Good Men, "Here's looking at you, kid" from Casablanca, "I'm walking here" from Midnight Cowboy , "Are you talking to me?,' from Taxi Driver, "Leave the gun, take the cannoli" from The Godfather, "I know" from The Empire Strikes Back , and "Kelly Clarkson" from The 40-Year-Old Virgin are just a handful of famous lines spoken instead of written.

Another brilliant example is Roy Scheider's "You're gonna need a bigger boat." Turns out, this was something of a catchphrase during production, said whenever things inevitably went wrong. Scheider sprinkled this quote throughout the shoot, and this one made the cut. Sure enough, it fit wonderfully in this memorable sequence.

The Crew Nearly Lost A Day's Worth Of Film When Orca II Sank

Made back in the early-to-mid '70s, Jaws didn't have the benefit of special effects wizardry. Many things went wrong during production on Jaws because the crew relied on things that didn't always work and several practical sets, including boats in the ocean, that weren't on steady waters.

At one point, as the boat Orca II sunk, two Panavision camera filled with dailies were quickly plummeting underwater. As reported by Mental Floss , the crew swiftly grabbed the film and stuffed it in a bucket of freshwater to prevent the saltwater from destroying the footage and ruining a day of shooting — which would be disastrous for several reasons, but doubly for this overextended production. They jumped on a plane to have Kodak develop it. While the footage was miraculously saved, the fates of the waterlogged cameras is unclear.

The Original Version Of Jaws Would've Had More Footage Of The Shark

One of the main reasons why Jaws remains one of our most effective horror movies is because it's extremely economical when it comes to its great white shark. We typically see from the shark's perspective , following his eye as he roams the water, looking for his next person to munch. It's a distinction that, along with its great editing, sharp performances, and iconic score (we'll discuss that more later), makes Jaws not merely a great film but one of the best blockbusters ever made. But as it turns out, the idea of keeping the shark at bay wasn't an intentional one .

It was a decision made by the filmmakers because the mechanical shark proved to be so fraught with problems, the footage was damn near unusable. Had things gone as planned, Jaws wouldn't be what it is today.

Steven Spielberg Thought Jaws Would Ruin His Directing Career

Following the tremendous success of Jaws , Steven Spielberg paved the course for one of the most prolific and influential filmmaking careers in the history of cinema. It's rare that a director becomes a household name, and one of the golden standards for which every young idealistic filmmaker sets out to showcase their vision in Hollywood. But during the troubles that ensued with Jaws , Spielberg didn't even think he would have a career at all .

As the production went increasingly long and the budget ballooned enormously, word started spreading around town that perhaps Spielberg wasn't the most dependable director in the business. It's certainly crazy to think that now, but at the time, when Spielberg still had so much to prove, he feared that this would be his final film. Alas, through his talent and determination, that was thankfully not the case.

Steven Spielberg Slept With A Stalk Of Celery Under His Pillow To Comfort Him During Jaws' Troubled Shoot

While time and experience allowed Steven Spielberg to be one of the most confident, accomplished working filmmakers of our time (and of all-time), the young filmmaker was ultimately haunted by the failures found in Jaws ' ever-troubled production.

Fretting about the difficulties of the shoot and what it could mean for his future, Spielberg didn't have the easiest time calming his nerves and getting some much-needed rest. Therefore, in an odd-but-ultimately-effective manner, Spielberg reportedly would sleep with a stalk of celery under his pillow. The scent was apparently comforting to the future Oscar-winning director, and it allowed Spielberg to get the rest he needed to combat every obstacle that came with filming this troubled movie.

Steven Spielberg Initially Thought John Williams' Iconic Score Was A Joke

The term "iconic" is thrown around a lot, to the point where it has almost lost its luster. But if there is any movie score that deserves to be called iconic, it's John Williams' work in Jaws . Much like the movie itself, one reason why the main theme works so well is because it's so simple. It's an alternating pattern of two notes — "E and F" or "F or F sharp" — that doesn't seem scary. But when it's used to build up nearly-unbearable tension, it's one of the most effective score pieces in cinematic history. But Steven Spielberg didn't immediately recognize the score's potential. In fact, as it was revealed in Jaws ' 30th anniversary DVD, he initially thought it was a joke. But Spielberg admitted later on that Williams' score is "at least half of Jaws ' success."

John Williams Was Also Conducting During The 1976 Academy Awards When He Won Best Original Score

For all of Steven Spielberg's accomplishments and everything else everyone did to make Jaws the cinematic classic we recognize it today, it's safe to say that Jaws wouldn't be nearly as memorable or haunting if it weren't for Williams' score. His theme, as we discussed, is one of the best and most easily recognizable in cinematic history; his suspenseful score does a sensational job of keeping the frightful audience in both excited and scared.

Sure enough, one of the three Oscars that Jaws received went to Williams (as well it should've), but accepting this particular award certainly proved to be an odd challenge. You see, during this 1976 Academy Awards ceremony, Williams was also conducting the award show's front-stage orchestra. Therefore, the recognized composer needed to rush on-and-off stage to keep the show moving.

These are only a handful of stories from Jaws ' famous troubled production. If you know a few other tales from the set of this Steven Spielberg movie, be sure to let us know in the comment section below.

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American Memory Lane

Jaws – 10 Cool Facts About The Movie

Jaws

Jaws – The Movie

Written by Cavan O’Grady

In 1975, the classic movie Jaws was released. It was a breakthrough film in several ways. Among them, it is largely considered the first summer blockbuster, it changed Steven Spielberg from a little known director to a very in-demand one, it led to three sequels and numerous similarly themed films, and it unfortunately has turned sharks into a much more feared fish than they deserve to be.

Be sure to add your comments in the “Leave a Reply” section at the bottom of this page

Below are some fun (and not-so-fun) facts about the hugely popular 1970s film.

Jaws Released

1. Jaws was supposed to be released during the holiday season of 1974, a traditionally strong time of the year for the biggest movies to come out. But its numerous delays forced it to be released on June 20th, 1975, a very appropriate day given its subject matter, but the start of a season when the worst movies had historically come out. It was assumed that people simply wanted to be outdoors for recreation and not in a theater. But the success of Jaws completely changed that industry thinking.

Jaws T-shirt

2. Steven Spielberg wasn’t well known and wasn’t the first choice to direct  Jaws.  The first person offered the directing position had a meeting with Universal Pictures producers and studio executives and kept referring to the aquatic villain as a whale, even after being corrected. So meeting-goers decided to go in another direction. Producers Richard Zanuck and David Brown had worked with Spielberg 1974 film  The Sugarland Express and were impressed with the young director . And since Spielberg had directed  Duel , a film about an evil trucker terrorizing a mild-mannered commuter, the producers felt that movie was similar in theme to  Jaws , making Spielberg a fine fit.

Jaws T-shirt

The Screenplay

3. The screenplay was written by Peter Benchley, whose novel the movie is based on. There was some tension between Benchley and Spielberg when the director wanted changes made in pre-production, but once filming began the two became fast friends over regular poker games and cocktails at Spielberg’s rented beach house. The poker games were probably a good night time distraction for Spielberg, as he spent many sleepless nights worrying about the rumors that he would be fired due to the film’s numerous delays and budgetary problems.

Jaws T-shirt

4. There were three 1.2 ton mechanical versions of the shark. They were all named Bruce after director Spielberg’s agent, Bruce Ramer. The Bruces were meant to appear in much more of the film, but due to many problems with them, the shark doesn’t appear onscreen until about an hour and twenty minutes into the two hour movie. Though the troubles with the Bruces were no doubt a nightmare during production, many feel that the shark not being seen allowed for the build-up and mystery that helped make the movie the classic that it has become.

The Catchphrase

5. “You’re gonna need a bigger boat” was actually a frequently uttered line the crew said to stingy producers about needing more space for equipment while they were shooting in the Atlantic. It became a catch-all for when things were going wrong, which was pretty much always. Roy Scheider (who played Chief Brody) knew exactly when it would work perfectly in the movie, ad-libbed it, and it became one of the most famous lines in movie history..

Jaws T-shirt

6. Richard Dreyfuss (Hooper) and Robert Shaw (Quint) had a contentious relationship during filming. Scheider believed it was Dreyfuss’s arrogance that led to the conflicts between them: ” (Shaw) really thought Dreyfuss needed a slapping down… (he thought he was a) young punk with no stage…” Dreyfuss has admitted there was conflict between them that reflected their characters’ relationship, but has said Shaw was kinder to him in private, and has downplayed the tension as the years have progressed. Shaw tragically died in Ireland at the age of 51, just a few years after Jaws was released.

Jaws T-shirt

7.   Quint’s (Shaw) speech about the USS Indianapolis is based on a harrowing true story during WWII. The actual ship was on a secret mission and torpedoed by a Japanese submarine in 1945; it sank within 12 minutes. Of the 1,195 crew aboard, approximately 300 went down with the ship. The remaining crew faced exposure, dehydration and saltwater poisoning in the open sea. The mission was so secret that the Navy only learned of the sinking four days later, when the 316 survivors were spotted during a routine patrol. The big exaggeration in Quint’s speech though was the role the sharks played. They actually stuck to feeding on the deceased, and the few living crew that they made contact with were probably by accident. Sharks generally avoid risk and prefer meals that won’t fight back. 

Jaws T-shirt

8. Spielberg didn’t immediately recognize the effectiveness of John Williams’ score and actually thought it was a joke, but later admitted that the simple alternating pattern of two notes — “E and F” or “F or F sharp”– was responsible for “at least half of Jaws’ success.”

Bigger Boat T-shirt

Jaws – Not A Cakewalk

9. The shoot was so troubled that Spielberg thought it would be the end of his career, but Jaws went on to become the highest grossing film of all-time up until that point. Over 67 million people in the U.S. went to see it when it was initially released in 1975, it remained the #1 film for 14 weeks, and made $123.1 million in U.S. theater rentals (the box office gross less the exhibitor’s cut). It is commonly considered the first “blockbuster,” summer or otherwise.

Jaws T-shirt

10. Both Benchley and Spielberg later regretted how Jaws affected the reputation of sharks. Shark hunting greatly increased after the film came out (with the notion of them being “man-killers” partly used as a reason) and the shark population along the eastern seaboard of North America greatly decreased as a result. Benchley later said, “Knowing what I know now, I could never write that book today… Sharks don’t target human beings, and they certainly don’t hold grudges.” Benchley’s regret and guilt led him to become a shark conservationist.

Jaws: Bonus Fact

And as a bonus fun fact, in 2014 Dreyfuss was in Ireland for a special screening of Jaws, and he was interviewed on the popular Irish talk/chat show “”The Late Late Show.” Robert Shaw’s 14-year-old granddaughter, Maeve Shaw, had arranged to meet him beforehand and was in the audience. When asked by host Ryan Tubridy why he had been so emotional in meeting her, Dreyfuss said (as camera shots cut away to Maeve several times, with both continuing to be very emotional), “When I met her, it was like closure. That was the first word I thought of. You have no idea how grand and large he was. It was like he was alive again; he died far too soon. I was thrilled to meet her.”

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One response to “Jaws – 10 Cool Facts About The Movie”

Cavan O'Grady Avatar

I wrote this and just want to make a correction on #7, which covers Quint’s speech about the USS Indianapolis. Many survivors have in fact talked about a number of living sailors being attacked and killed by sharks. Sharks apparently did feed on the deceased but then moved on to the living.

Several online websites that I used have quoted Captain Lewis Haynes (the senior medical officer on board) and other Navy veterans who have said that they never witnessed any shark attacks. It appears that no one is lying, but rather that crew members in the water were very spread out (they did congregate in groups) and had very different experiences when it came to sharks.

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30 Fun And Interesting Facts About Jaws

Jaws is a 1975 American thriller movie directed by Steven Spielberg and based on Peter Benchley’s 1974 novel of the same name. In the movie, a giant man-eating great white shark attacks beachgoers on Amity Island, a fictional New England summer resort town, prompting the local police chief to hunt it with the help of a marine biologist and a professional shark hunter. Take a look below for 30 more fun and interesting facts about Jaws.

1. The movie stars Roy Scheider as police chief Martin Brody, Robert Shaw as shark hunter Quint, Richard Dreyfuss as oceanographer Matt Hooper, Murray Hamilton as Larry Vaughn, the major of Amity Island, and Lorraine Gary as Brody’s wife, Ellen.

2. The screenplay for Jaws is credited to both Benchley, who wrote the first drafts, and actor-writer Carl Gottlieb, who rewrote the script during principal photography.

3. Jaws was shot mostly on location on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. The movie had a troubled production, going over budget and past schedule.

4. As the art department’s mechanical sharks suffered many malfunctions, Steven Spielberg decided to mostly suggest the animal’s presence, employing an ominous, minimalistic theme created by composer John Williams to indicate the shark’s impending appearances.

5. Universal Pictures gave Jaws what was then an exceptionally wide release for a major studio picture, with over 450 screens, accompanied by an extensive marketing campaign with a heavy emphasis on television spots and tie-in merchandise.

6. Considered one of the greatest movies ever made, Jaws was the typical summer blockbuster, with its release regarded as a watershed moment in motion picture history.

7. Jaws was the highest grossing movie of all time until the release of Star Wars .

8. Along with Star Wars, Jaws was pivotal in establishing the modern Hollywood business model, which revolves around high box-office returns from action and adventure pictures with simple high-concept premises that are released during the summer in thousands of theaters and supported by heavy advertising.

9. In 2001, Jaws was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry, being deemed, “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

10. According to writer Carl Gottlieb, the line, “You’re gonna need a bigger boat,” was not scripted, but was ab-libbed by Roy Scheider.

11. According to director Steven Spielberg, the prop arm looked too fake in the scene where Chrissie’s remains are discovered, so instead, they buried a female crew member in the sand with only her arm exposed.

12. Robert Shaw couldn’t stand Richard Dreyfuss and the two argued all the time, which resulted in some good tension between Hooper and Quint.

13. Over 67 million people in the United States went to see Jaws when it was initially released in 1975, making it the first summer “blockbuster.”

14. According to The Making of Steven Spielberg’s Jaws documentary, the shooting star that appears during the night scene where Brody loads his revolver was real, not an optical effect.

15. Director Steven Spielberg named the shark “Bruce” after his lawyer.

16. Composer John Williams conducted the orchestra during the 1976 Academy Awards, so when it was announced that he won the Oscar for Best Score, he had to run up to the podium to accept his Oscar and then run back to continue conducting the orchestra.

17. Three mechanical sharks were made, each with specialized functions. One shark was open on the right side, one was open on the left side, and the third was fully skinned. Each shark cost approximately $250,000.

18. Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, was used as Amity Island primarily because even 12 miles out to sea, the sandy bottom was only 30 feet down, allowing the mechanical shark to function. Residents were paid $64 to scream and run across the beach as extras.

19. When the shark was built, it was never tested in the water. When it was put in the water at Martha’s Vineyard, it sank straight to the ocean floor. It took a team of divers to retrieve it.

20. Author Peter Benchley was thrown off the set after objecting to the climax.

21. In the actual Jersey Beach shark attacks of 1916, which Hooper mentions in the movie, the sequence of attacks is similar to that of the movie: a swimmer in the surf, a dog, a boy, and the leg of a man in a tidal slough.

22. Most of the movie was shot handheld to best countermand the ocean’s swell.

23. Director Steven Spielberg played first clarinet for the beach scene.

24. Brody’s dog in the movie was actually Steven Spielberg’s real dog, Elmer.

25. Director Steven Spielberg shot roughly 25% of the movie from water level to provide the viewers the perspective as if they were treading water.

26. Steven Spielberg said that when he first read the novel, he found himself rooting for the shark because the human characters were so unlikable.

27. Author Peter Benchley had mentioned that if he had known about the actual behavior of sharks, he would have never written the book.

28. The average summer tourist population of Martha’s Vineyard before the movie was released was approximately 5,000 people. After it came out, the population went up to 15,000.

29. To create the sound of a drowning woman during post-production, Susan Backlinie was positioned, head upturned, in front of a microphone, while water from above was poured down into her throat.

30. During the display in which Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw compare battle scars, Roy Scheider lifts up his shirt to reveal an appendix incision. This wasn’t a prosthetic, but Scheider’s own scar.

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20 Things You Didn't Know About 'Jaws'

We'll need a bigger boat to hold all the amazing trivia about the original summer movie blockbuster.

by Tracey Minkin, AARP , June 17, 2020

Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw in a scene from the film Jaws

AF archive/Alamy Stock Photo

What got you? The terrifying poster? That two-note theme music? The shot of that poor girl's legs from the shark's point of view? All of the above?

Forty-five years ago this weekend, Jaws — the world's first summer blockbuster — hit America's movie screens and quickly became the highest grossing film of all time (for a while). Who doesn't think, when scanning the ocean before a dip, that unforgettable line: “Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water ..."

But did you know that that famous tagline — one of the most famous, in fact, in film — is actually not from the first film, but the sequel ( Jaws 2 ) that came out three years later? Read on for 20 more fantastic trivia tidbits from one of America's most unforgettable films.

1. Jaws wasn't even supposed to come out in the summer

It's hard to separate Steven Spielberg's brilliant adaptation of Peter Benchley's novel without thinking of it as a summer movie. While the film hit theaters on June 20, 1975, starring Roy Scheider as police chief Martin Brody, Robert Shaw as shark fisherman Quint, and  Richard Dreyfuss  as oceanographer Matt Hooper, it was originally planned for a Christmas 1974 release. Lengthy shooting delays (you try getting mechanical sharks to work and the weather to cooperate at the same time) made that goal impossible.

2. Martha's Vineyard played the role of Amity Island ... because of a storm

Most fans know that the famed New England island, with its deep offshore waters and sandy beaches, was the real-life version of novelist Peter Benchley's fictional Amity Island from the book. What they might not know is that the location scout planned to check out nearby Nantucket Island instead, but stormy weather forced his ferry to Martha's Vineyard, where he discovered the many natural features that lured the production there.

The movie poster for the 1975 film Jaws

Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images

3. The iconic poster wasn't created for the film

The image of a girl swimming naively across the top of the water while a massive great white surges toward her from below was actually purloined from an illustration by artist Roger Kastel for the novel's paperback edition. (Kastel based the big fish on a great white diorama at the American Museum of Natural History, and the swimmer was modeled after a woman whom Kastel had sketched for an ad in  Good Housekeeping . The story goes that he asked her to perch on a stool and pretend to swim to get the pose just right.)

4. The slate had teeth

The slate — also known as “sticks,” “clapperboard” or “clapboard” — is the well-known tablet with a hinged top that gets clapped down to mark the beginning of a film scene (markings on the tablet help editors synch the film and sound). For  Jaws , though, the normally flat edges were replaced with a sharp set of teeth — uppers and lowers.

5. The shark is surprisingly camera shy

The story's nemesis — a great white shark that attacks and terrorizes the fictional community of Amity Island — doesn't appear on screen until one hour and 21 minutes into the two-hour movie.

A behind the scenes look at Jaws

Courtesy Everett Collection

6. The shark was named Bruce

Most  Jaws  aficionados might already know that the three different versions of the 1.2-ton, mechanically powered predator created for the film (this was long before computer-generated imagery, or CGI, remember) were all nicknamed “Bruce” by Spielberg after his lawyer, Bruce Ramer. But how many fans know that the other thing the crew was known to call the faux Carcharodon carcharias (and the huge and breakdown-prone rig that made it work) was “that sonofabitchin’ bastard rig,” according to Carl Gottleib, 82, who wrote the final version of the screenplay during filming, played a small role in the movie, and wrote  The Jaws Log , which director Rod Lurie calls “easily the greatest ‘making-of’ book ever written."

7. George Lucas got his head stuck in Bruce's mouth

Before filming began on Martha's Vineyard, Spielberg invited industry friends (including  Martin Scorsese , George Lucas and screenwriter John Milius) to check out the mechanical shark in development. When Lucas playfully stuck his head in the shark's mouth, Milius and Spielberg grabbed the controls and clamped the jaw shut. And it stuck, trapping the rising-star director. After prying Lucas loose, the guys snuck out of the workshop, afraid they'd broken the contraption.

8. A real shark shown in the movie, caught and hung up on the dock, came all the way from Florida

Needing a big shark that the townspeople could believe might have been the perp behind the early attacks in the film, the crew was under pressure to catch one off the location shoot on Martha's Vineyard. But nothing turned up that was big enough. Turns out the closest area where sharks big enough to pass might be catchable was all the way down in Florida. The production sent two fellows down to arrange things with local fishermen, and lo and behold, they landed a big shark. Trouble was, now they had to get it back to New England before its flesh began rotting. Packaged up in its own crate with as much ice as possible, the fish flew on a private jet and was hauled out to the location and hung up for the scene. But shooting takes time, and the poor carcass was getting fouler and fouler as the days piled up. Watch the faces of some of the actors doing scenes right next to it for a clue to how much the whole business stunk.

Actor Robert Shaw in front of a chalkboard showing a drawing of a shark eating a person

9. Robert Shaw was shot at when he got to Martha's Vineyard

The marvelous playwright/actor had just arrived with his wife, Mary Ure, and their elegant manservant, Eric Harrison, to Martha's Vineyard to begin filming. Imagine their shock late that first night when a local eccentric fired a few rifle bullets through the front door of the rental house, which penetrated walls and even chipped tiles in a downstairs bath. The bullets weren't meant for the star, however — the local thought the place was empty. And all credit to Harrison, who was the first out the door in robe and slippers, examined the fresh bullet holes in the door, proclaiming, “I believe they're shooting, sir.” The rifleman was later fined and released.

10. Peter Benchley scored a cameo in the film

Having worked as a reporter for the  Washington Post  before writing the novel that would become a massive best seller the very summer Spielberg was filming the movie version, Benchley brought work history to his cameo as a TV reporter in the film's pivotal 4th of July Weekend beach panic scene.

11. Benchley bonded with Spielberg and company over booze and cards

While the author and the budding auteur had a little static at first over some comments Spielberg had made about Benchley's original screenplay for the film, the two quickly made up once they met and enjoyed cocktails and rounds of poker at the beach house the director was renting during the project.

Director Steven Spielberg on the set of Jaws

Universal/Getty Images

Director Steven Spielberg on the set of "Jaws."

12. Steven Spielberg “appears” two times in his own movie

No Alfred Hitchcock, who famously appears in “there he is!” cameos in his own films, the young director shows up in  Jaws  in two arcane — and only audible — places. One: His voice crackles over the radio of Quint's boat, the Orca, as the Amity Island dispatcher that patches Brody through to his wife when the chief is out with Quint and Hooper. Two: For a scene including a local band marching through town on the 4th of July, famed composer John Williams was afraid to ask his professional orchestra to sound ... well, amateur. But Spielberg had already professed his love of playing clarinet in his high school band to Williams, and that was just the amateur touch the soundtrack needed. Spielberg picked up the clarinet again, played a Sousa march with Williams's orchestra, and several perfectly flawed bars made it into the final cut.

13. Steven Spielberg's dogs appear in his movie

Police chief Brody's dogs are played by the director's cocker spaniels, Elmer and Zalman.

14. A lot went into making that first shark attack terrifying

Who can forget the shark's first victim, the poor girl who gets dragged back and forth in the water? To get that violent action to look real, Spielberg rigged underwater cables to literally drag actor Susan Backlinie turbulently through the water. (Further, the actor wasn't warned when the jerking would begin, so her onscreen surprise is genuine.) To get the sound of her drowning to add to the audio postproduction, Backlinie was placed in front of a microphone with her head turned up to the ceiling and water was poured down her throat from above.

15. The “real” Quint ends up owning the movie's biggest scare

A Martha's Vineyard local named Craig Kingsbury — a true salt — was the inspiration for much of Robert Shaw's style as Quint (including his improvised ramblings). Not only did Kingsbury end up with a small role as another local fisherman in the film (named Ben Gardner), but his disembodied head pops out of a sunken porthole in what's largely considered the movie's biggest scare.

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16. That scary moment was filmed in a swimming pool in the editor's backyard

Looking for the ultimate scare, Spielberg had already done extra filming of the discovery of the head by Richard Dreyfuss's character in a special tank back on the mainland after location filming wrapped. But he wasn't happy with it, so his legendary editor Verna Fields offered up her backyard swimming pool as a place to reshoot the scene (they poured a gallon of milk from Verna's refrigerator into the pool water to make it look more like the real ocean). If you've seen the movie, you know this take was one for the record books (and for the record books, that's a latex recreation of Kingsbury's head).

17. The location crew formed its own Jaws softball team

As an antidote to the rigors of location work, the crew formed a softball team and on Sundays took on locals.

18. Post- Jaws  hysteria wasn't a publicity stunt

We were afraid to go back in the water, and sometimes things got out of hand. One Southern California beach had to be cleared by lifeguards because of a shark-sighting panic. Turns out it was dolphins. On a more serious note, the idea of a vengeful rogue shark (a fictional creation) spurred a national fervor of fear, a drop in beach tourism, and a rise in shark killings. It has taken decades of science and activism to help post- Jaws  generations understand and respect the role sharks play in the oceans and the ecosystem overall.

19. Spielberg had nightmares later, too

While a generation of beachgoers emerged from the blockbuster film forever creeped out about swimming in ocean deeps, the director himself had nightmares for months after shooting wrapped. His dreams, though, weren't of shark attacks, but of still being in charge of the shoot. He'd awaken thinking he was still on Martha's Vineyard, riddled with anxiety and panic.

20. No one wrote the movie's most famous line

"You're gonna need a bigger boat,” uttered unforgettably by Roy Scheider, was improvised by the actor on the day of shooting.

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Toptenz.net

10 Surprising Facts About the Movie “Jaws”

Karl Smallwood

Jaws is often called the original summer blockbuster, so before the next glut of CGI-laden superhero movies fills screens worldwide, why not read a few lesser known facts about the OG blockbuster that set the precedent that allows them to exist? Starting with…

10. Jaws was a PG Release

Jaws is a film that contains a scene of a man being brutally eaten alive by a shark while screaming (fun fact: the actor supposedly broke his leg during that scene so the screams of pain you hear are real), people having the limbs shorn off, and the most iconic jump scare in cinema history. On top of this, the film also involves scenes involving drinking, smoking, swearing, and at least one instance of a shark eating a chubby kid on a raft. Amazingly, censors of the time saw all this and thought to themselves,  “ yeah, this seems suitable for kids.”

Because yeah, Jaws was a PG rated movie, meaning anyone could go watch this thing so long as they had parental supervision, even if they were still at risk of pooping their pants literally instead of metaphorically. Think about that the next time you go watch an Avengers movie and realize it’s a PG-13 because Sam Jackson says the F-word.

9. It Originally Starred Dwarf Stuntmen

movie jaws facts

The undeniable star of Jaws is the shark, a role that was variously played by a notoriously unreliable mechanical shark (which we’ll get to in a moment) and several real sharks filmed by the crew. The problem was that the shark, who we’ll just call Jaws even though he had a name (which we’ll also get to), is supposed to be a shark of exceptional size, which kind of created a problem when the crew went to film some real Great Whites and realized they’d look noticeably smaller than their robo-shark. An ingenious solution was found in the form of several midget stuntmen.

The idea was to dress these stuntmen up in the same diving suits as the regular cast and film them next to some average-sized Great Whites, creating a forced perspective that made the sharks look super-huge and buff. To complete the illusion, the production team even built a smaller version of the shark cage seen at the end of the movie that the stuntmen were supposed to float around in. This cage wasn’t built as sturdily as an actual shark cage and as a result, before one of the stuntmen could climb inside it, a Great White tore it to pieces. This led to a total rewrite to ensure…

8. Hooper Survived Because Footage of the Cage Being Destroyed was Too Good Not to Use

The footage of a shark tearing apart the shark cage at the climax of the movie was 100% real and was so good Spielberg insisted that it had to go into the movie. The problem was that the original script called for Hooper to be inside the cage at the time, and for him to be killed in the ensuing attack, just like in the book . Another problem was that after seeing a shark tear apart a shark-proof cage none of the stuntmen would get back into the water.

Not wanting to lose the footage, a hasty rewrite was made to show that Hooper survived by swimming to the bottom of the ocean and hiding from the shark. This change also allowed the editors to use footage of the shark attacking from below (where it’s most obvious nobody is in the cage), framing it as if it’s from Hooper’s point of view as he cowered from the shark in a steadily growing cloud of his own urine.

7. Spielberg Laughed When He First Heard the Theme

John Williams’ theme for Jaws is one of the most iconic in all of cinema. Countless articles and academic papers have been written exploring the deceptive depth of the theme and how it affects those who hear it on an almost primal level. Though considered an integral part of the film’s success today, Spielberg was apparently not all that impressed with the theme when he first heard it. In fact, he laughed out loud when William’s played it for him.

You see, Spielberg had assumed that the film’s score would be more akin to that of a swashbuckling pirate movie and thought Williams’ minimalist take on the theme was too Spartan . However, Spielberg deferred to Williams’ judgement for final decision, apparently quipping “okay, let’s give it a shot” when Williams insisted the theme would work. We’re assuming Spielberg has never since question Williams’ judgement after the success of Jaws.

6. The Shark Sank the First Time it was Put Into the Water

movie jaws facts

As noted previously, the robo-shark used for many of the close-ups in the movie was unreliable to an almost comical degree. This is no better summed up than by what the shark did the very first time it was lowered into the water: it  sank like a depressed brick of lead with concrete shoes. Apparently it hadn’t occurred to anybody to check if the shark floated while making it.

Along with sinking, the shark often malfunctioned and would sometimes simply stop working for no reason at all. This not only caused the movie to fall 100 days behind schedule, but also meant that half the shots of the movie involving the shark didn’t have the shark in frame.

Curiously, it’s been noted that the fact Spielberg had to film around the fact the shark wasn’t there most of the time, instead having to suggest its presence, made the movie better. Which kind of makes sense. The reason Jaws is such a scary movie is because there’s a constant threat that the shark could appear at any moment and chow down on your butthole. If the shark had been on screen for 50% of the movie like Spielberg had originally planned, its few sporadic appearances would have had less impact. So yeah, when you watch Jaws and find yourself feeling on edge throughout the entire film, that wouldn’t be the case if the shark had actually worked and you could have seen how crappy it actually looked most of the time.

5. The Shark’s Name was Bruce

movie jaws facts

The shark in Jaws  is always referred to as either, simply, “the shark” or else Jaws, which is weird since throughout filming his name was Bruce. The name is supposedly a name coined by the the production crew as a nod to Spielberg’s lawyer Bruce Raynor who, like the shark, was a bit temperamental.

Spielberg himself wasn’t personally a fan of the name since, unlike the mechanical shark, his lawyer sometimes actually worked . So instead, he came up with an altogether more apt nickname considering the numerous mechanical faults the shark suffered throughout production:  The Great White Turd .

4. Spielberg Spent $3,000 of His Own Money for “One More Scream”

Jaws, hands down, contains one of the single greatest jump scares in cinema history. We’re of course talking about when Hooper finds Ben Gardner’s boat, and a big rubber head comes flying out of a shark shaped hole in the hull. That scene wasn’t in the original cut of the movie and was only added after Spielberg watched the audience reaction to the reveal of the shark at the film’s climax (the bit immediately prior to the “ we’re gonna need a bigger boat ” line), and realized the reaction wasn’t as intense as he’d hoped.

So Spielberg went back to the studio and asked for $3,000 to film another scene with a bigger jump scare and promptly got told not to do one. To be fair to the production company the film was 100 days behind schedule and over budget, so they were within their right to say no, but luckily for us, Spielberg didn’t take no for an answer .

With the studio refusing to pony up the cash, Spielberg decided to film the scene in someone’s pool using his own money. To make the water look more like the kind of place you’d find a sunken boat, Spielberg had the pool filled with milk powder and then put a big tarp over the top to limit the amount of light that got through to the bottom. Admittedly greedy for “one more scream” the director then instructed the sound engineers to make the jump scare happen before the music reached it’s natural crescendo, to make everyone poop their pants the first time they saw it.

3. It Had one of the Widest Releases of Any Film Ever

movie jaws facts

Jaws was, as noted, one of the first, if not the first, major summer blockbusters. In fact, prior to the release of Jaws and then Star Wars a few years later, the summer was considered a low period for cinema since it was believed nobody would waste a ball-sweltering summer’s day sitting in a cool, air conditioned cinema. Oh, how wrong they were.

Upon release,  Jaws set numerous records for having such a wide release, opening in some 400 cinemas on its first day. But here’s the really crazy part:  Jaws was such a massive phenomenon that the number of cinemas screening it across the US more than doubled over the course of two months. This was unheard of back then and rarely, if ever, happens today since most films make the bulk of their money in the opening weekend. It’s a testament then to the sheer inertia of Jaws that after two months at the cinema, demand was still so high 500 more theatres decided to screen it, too.

2. It Kinda Ruined Sharks (and Beaches) for Everyone

movie jaws facts

As noted in the previous entry, releasing a film during the summer season used to be considered box office suicide since it was believed everyone would be too busy having fun at the beach. Jaws changed all that and during the summer of 1975 beach attendance fell nationwide.

The drop in beach attendance was credited to both the success of the film, which saw millions of Americans flock to cinemas, as well as the fact it kind of made it scary to go into the water. Speaking of which, the film is still criticized today for painting an unnecessarily harsh and objectively incorrect picture of sharks, which hardly ever attack humans . However, the success of Jaws saw shark attacks not only being reported upon more often (creating the false impression that they were more common than they actually are) but also a more negative perception of the animal, which led to many of them being killed for no real reason. All of which kind of leaves a sour taste in our mouths, so let’s end on something a little lighter, specifically that…

1. Michael Caine Loved the 4th Movie

To date Jaws has made more money and has a higher Rotten Tomatoes score than all three of its sequels combined. The fourth film in particular has an impressive 0% rating on the website, and is largely considered to be the biggest cinematic turd since the one Jeff Goldblum finds in Jurassic Park .

According to critics the film has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and is more painful to sit through than a prostate exam from a pirate with hand tremors. One person who disagress is Michael Caine, who has said of the film:  “ I have never seen it, but by all accounts it is terrible. However, I have seen the house that it built, and it is terrific .”

Along with being paid a pretty penny for starring in the film, Caine has praised the fact that it features a realistic romance between two middle aged people (something that’s rarely seen in cinema) and enjoyed that he basically got a free trip to the Bahamas. In case you’re thinking that Caine is only positive about the film because he got a free vacation out of it, starring in the film caused him to miss the 1987 Oscars . And it’s important to note, he actually won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor that year, for the film Hannah and Her Sisters . In other words, Michael Caine had so much fun pretending to fight a giant, fake shark in a terrible Jaws sequel he didn’t mind not collecting the most prestigious award for acting in person.

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Jeffrey Voorhees, the kid who played Alex Kintner (boy on the raft) is NOT chubby. Wtf?

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Screen Rant

15 things you didn't know about the making of jaws.

Jaws was the blockbuster film that put Steven Spielberg on the map, but what went on behind the scenes of the famous shark flick?

One probably wouldn't know it while watching, but the making of Jaws was a complete comedy of errors. The movie is obviously a masterpiece, and it is an exceptionally made film. Even to this day, nearly fifty years later, it is still taught in schools and used as a prime example of various filmmaking techniques. It doesn't get much better than this.

But, like anything worth making, the process was a frustrating affair. It seemed like anything that could go wrong did go wrong, and a lot of people were not happy throughout the process.

Updated on July 28th, 2022 by Melody MacReady :  Over 45 years later, Jaws remains an iconic film that bridges multiple genres. It's a horror film, it's a sea-epic, it's an adventure film, it's a thriller, and it even has quite a bit of comedy in it. It's because of this that it remains one of Steven Spielberg's greatest but the making of the film was not as much of a joy.

Steven Spielberg, the crew, and the cast all were put to the test with the budget being overblown, a month's worth of shooting turned into over three, and numerous problems with the shark. Thankfully, it all worked out in the end but there is so much that went into making Jaws the classic that it is today.

The Rights Were Bought In Haste

Jaws  was an incredibly difficult movie to make, and that would certainly be apparent by reading the book. Unfortunately, producers saw dollar signs and didn't put much care into how the movie would be filmed.

RELATED:  10 Ways Jaws (1975) Still Holds Up Today

Producers Richard D. Zanuck and David Brown quickly devoured the book and  bought the movie rights for $175,000 before Benchley's novel  was even published. They didn't think about the filmmaking process - they just thought it would make for a great movie. Brown admitted later that he would never have bought the rights had he known just how difficult it would prove to be.

Steven Spielberg Was Only 27

Jaws is the movie of an accomplished, seasoned, and experienced director. Which makes it all the more amazing to consider that Steven Spielberg was only 27 throughout filming. Jaws was filmed from May to October of 1974.

Spielberg was born on December 18, 1946, meaning he was just shy of 28 years old when filming wrapped in October. It's frankly amazing what he managed to do with the movie despite being so young and inexperienced. It would pay off and launch him to mega-success as one of Hollywood's most iconic directors .

Peter Benchley Has A Quick Cameo

The original author of the Jaws novel was given the chance to appear in the big-budget movie based on his work. It's not a blink-and-miss cameo either, he's actually commanding a good fifteen seconds of screentime as the reporter on the beach.

This is actually a common kind of cameo in films. Stephen King makes numerous cameos in films and mini-series based on his horror novels. One of the most famous examples is Stan Lee, who made cameos in a multitude of Marvel movies before his tragic passing.

Spielberg Was Not The First Director

When it came time to find a director, Zanuck and Brown sought out John Sturges. Sturges had previously directed a movie called The Old Man And The Sea , released in 1958. Adapting Hemingway is very different than filming an action blockbuster, and he was reconsidered for Dick Richards.

However, Richards had a very annoying habit: he kept referring to Jaws as a whale. In fact, this irritated the producers so much that they fired him . It was then that the relatively inexperienced Spielberg was offered the job. The only thing is he didn't really want it.

Spielberg Was Contractually Trapped Into Directing The Movie

Spielberg did a wonderful job with Jaws , but he wanted to work on something more esteemed than a shark adventure movie. He reportedly didn't want to be typecast as "the truck and shark director," as he had previously found success with the TV movie Duel , which follows a psychotic truck driver chasing a man through the Mojave Desert.

RELATED:  10 Best Steven Spielberg Movies, According To Ranker

Spielberg got cold feet before shooting began and wanted out in order to direct other movies. Unfortunately, he had already signed the contract, and Universal threw him a megaphone and directors' chair and told him to get to work.

Peter Benchley Was Not The Best Screenwriter

Peter Benchley wrote the source novel and is given credit alongside Carl Gottlieb as the writer of the movie, although not much of Benchley's script was used. While Benchley made a compelling novel, he proved a lackluster screenwriter.

Spielberg hated the original drafts, with much of the criticism going to the unlikeable characters and a subplot featuring an affair between Ellen Brody and Matt Hooper . which is a common problem with the novel as well. Spielberg eventually found Gottlieb, and a quick dialogue polish turned into a complete re-writing of the script. Many other writers provided some specific alterations, including Dirty Harry writer John Milius.

The Movie's Poster Was Actually Meant For The Book

Back in the 1970s, a poster was pivotal for marketing since audiences couldn't just look up trailers like they can today. So, that iconic poster of the great white shark coming up towards a swimmer from below was an eye-catcher that remains what many people think of when they think of Jaws .

It's interesting to think that the poster audiences saw was never meant to be for the film's poster. According to AARP , Roger Kastel illustrated that image for the paperback version of Peter Benchley's novel.

The Shark Has A Name

It's never stated in the movie but behind the scenes, the animatronic shark was such a pain for Steven Spielberg that he actually nicknamed it Bruce. Spielberg got the name from his lawyer Bruce Ramer and since this information has come out, many fans have nicknamed the in-movie shark Bruce as well .

This would not be the end of the nicknames. Each movie has its own shark named by the fans: Brucette in Jaws 2 , Brucetta in Jaws 3D , and Vengeance in Jaws: The Revenge .

Hooper & Quint Were Cast With Just Nine Days To Go

With just a little over a week to go, Spielberg and his team faced one little problem: they didn't have a Hooper or a Quint. Quint was offered to actors such as Lee Marvin , but everyone declined. The producers then suggested Robert Shaw, who reportedly hated the book. However, he took the role at the urging of his then-wife, Mary Ure.

George Lucas suggested Richard Dreyfuss after working with him on American Graffiti .  When he finally accepted, Spielberg told him not to read the book, as he planned on changing so much that it would be pointless.

Richard Dreyfuss Did Not Have Faith In Jaws

After months of production being extended and going far over the budget with cast and crew both miserable, it's easy to understand why some thought Jaws would bomb. According to Yahoo , one of the movie's leading men, Richard Dreyfuss, was actually so convinced that Jaws was a failure, he told people not to see it prior to release.

Much to his surprise, Jaws would go on to be one of Richard Dreyfuss' biggest films and become one of the first examples of a blockbuster. It also would be the start of a shark movie phenomenon that continues to this day with many other films about killer sharks.

One Of The Scariest Scenes Was Filmed In A Pool

Despite having already wrapped up filming, Steven Spielberg was not happy with the results of the famous Ben Gardner scene. Apparently, when Hooper found the corpse, it just wasn't scary enough so Spielberg worked with the editor Verna Fields and reshot the scene with a small crew in her swimming pool .

RELATED:  The 15 Scariest Kills Throughout The Entire Jaws Franchise

The result was the jumpscare sequence that terrified audiences. To think it is all filmed in a six-foot-deep pool but Spielberg being the master class filmmaker made it look like it's in the black void of the ocean.

They Tried Training A Great White Shark

The producers, after buying the movie rights without thinking through the logistics, realized they had a problem. Jaws is about shark attacks, so they needed a shark. And not just any shark: a vicious great white that would attack human actors without harming them.

Their solution? To train a great white shark, as stated by SlashFilm . They actually tried doing so but quickly gave up after realizing that it was impossible. Expensive mechanical sharks were made instead - much to the chagrin of the producers.

Robert Shaw Was An Enormous Pain

As great as Shaw is as Quint, he proved an enormous pain for the cast and crew. He also seemingly hated Richard Dreyfuss, so much of their antagonistic banter in the film has a shade of truth and authenticity. However, according to SlashFilm , Shaw might have been antagonistic on purpose to make the rivalry between Hooper and Quint feel more real.

Finally, Shaw was a notorious alcoholic and often binge drank on set. Unfortunately, heavy drinking and alcoholism would lead to the death of Shaw's wife, Mary Ure, and possibly Shaw himself; he died in 1978 from a heart attack.

Shooting In The Ocean Caused Countless Problems

Spielberg himself attributes the disastrous production to his young age, inexperience, and hubris, as he didn't think shooting on the open water would be a problem. It most certainly was. As per Bold Entrance , the animatronic shark suffered many mechanical problems, like the saltwater wreaking havoc on the shark's pneumatic hoses and causing corrosion.

Cameras got soaked from the constant splashing of water. Shooting on the open water caused civilian boats to float into frames. The sharks often ballooned from the neoprene foam taking on water. Everyone got seasick and sunburnt. By the end of filming, Spielberg feared for his future in the industry. Thankfully, Jaws proved to be one of many great successes despite a rocky production .

A Now-Famous Line Was Improvised

Jaws is filled to the brim with memorable quotes from many different characters. One of the most iconic is when Martin Brody sees the shark for the first time and says to Quint, "You're gonna need a bigger boat." In terms of delivery and execution, it just sounds like a line meant to hook audiences.

The truth is that it was all Roy Scheider. That line was never in the script and the actor improvised it on the spot which led to cinema history. Now "You're gonna need a bigger boat' can be found on clothes, mugs, and other forms of merchandise. Even Stephen King stated that he considers it the greatest line in cinema history.

NEXT:  15 Of The Best Quotes From Jaws

9 things about sharks you saw in movies that are actually wrong, according to an expert

Movies have a way of influencing the way we see the world. When it comes to sharks, they've drawn the portrait of blood-lusting vicious predators that'll go to any length to chomp at delicious humans. 

But is that really true? Insider interviewed marine biologist and doctoral student Amani Webber-Schultz  to assess shark facts that in the movies "Jaws" (1975), "Finding Nemo" (2003) and "The Meg" (2018).

Here are some inaccuracies she called out — plus one thing a movie got right.

Punching a shark on the nose won't help you much 

"I don't even know who came up with the idea that you should hit a shark on the nose to get away from them," Webber-Schultz said. 

Like anything that's attacking you, "you should probably be hitting them in whatever places you can to get them away from you," she said.  

Webber-Shultz studies sharks at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. She's working on a Ph.D.  looking at how water interacts with tiny scales on shark skin, called denticles.

It's those scales that make the shark nose the wrong target for a sucker punch. 

The scales around the nose are extra resistant to protect the shark from cuts and bruises when they are "poking around trying to figure out what something is," said Webber-Schultz.

So when Martin Brody, the protagonist in the 1975 classic "Jaws, " is stabbing the nose of the animatronic monster, he may not be doing much good. 

The soft underbelly is the best target

One of the best places to strike might be the shark's underbelly. 

"Structurally, the weakest spot on a shark, in terms of ability to actually give them injury and be somewhat catastrophic to them, is their stomach," Webber-Schultz said. 

The stomach is not as sturdy as the upper part of their body, which has a very big layer of muscle and tissue, she said.

But stabbing this predator might not be enough. Sharks have been known to be able to swim with "holes in their body," as long as the skin can still keep essential organs inside, said Webber-Schultz. 

"Because sharks are crazy," she said. 

Great whites are much smaller than the shark in "Jaws"

Those designing the shark got one thing right: He has five gills on each side of his head.

"One of the biggest things that they got wrong is his size, though," per Webber-Schultz. 

In the film, Brody estimates him to be around 25 feet. This is far larger than the largest great whites  that we know about, she said. 

Though females tend to be smaller than males, they tend to get around 16 feet maximum length . 

"So Bruce is about 10 feet larger than the average great white shark that we know of," she said, using the affectionate name director Steven Spielberg gave to the shark.

Sharks aren't the ravenous monsters they are made to be in movies

Unlike in the movie where sharks are stalking character after character, lusting for human blood, sharks are actually pretty slow eaters. 

Unlike humans, who have a fast metabolism and have to keep eating food to keep active, sharks have a slow metabolism and it takes them a lot longer to break down a meal, Webber-Schultz said. 

"Once they get enough in a meal, they'll just swim around and let all of that digest," she said. 

Bruce would likely have had its fill from eating the skinny-dipping Chrissie Watkins who is killed at the beginning of the movie.

Sharks don't go for humans 

Or more likely, the shark would not have come back for seconds. Sharks usually go looking for their favorite meals, and humans aren't naturally on the menu. 

"Often when they bite people, it's a curiosity bite, meaning they just want to know what we are," said Webber-Schultz.

But that would have made for a much less interesting movie. 

"This movie was really influential in creating this public perception of sharks, that they are man-eaters, and then the subsequent terror that people felt after watching it," said Webber-Schultz.

"Now I think we're kind of bouncing back from this. You see a lot of people realizing how important they are to this planet," she said. 

One they got right: Sharks can't smell a drop of blood a mile away 

Just like humans, sharks need smell particles to actually enter their noses to smell. That means that if the blood is miles away, they won't smell it. 

It's a misconception that sharks work mostly on their sense of smell. Just like us "they have sight. They do have ears. They can hear," but they also rely on "their lateral-line system, which allows them to sense vibrations in the water," said Webber-Schultz. 

"So if they're within a certain amount of feet of, say, an injured fish, they can actually feel the vibrations from that fish flopping around and turn towards that and think, "Oh, that might be an injured thing that I can eat," she said. 

So "Finding Nemo" hit the nail on the head when they showed blood actually going into the shark's nose, she said. 

Sharks don't go into a frenzy, they're actually pretty selective hunters

Where "Finding Nemo" went wrong, is in what happened after the blood went in the nose of the shark, aptly named Bruce as well. 

"Sharks do not go into a frenzy when they smell blood, but they do get curious, so often they will completely turn to where that scent of blood came from and swim towards it," Webber-Schultz said. 

Because of their slow metabolism, sharks have to make decisions about whether the energy they will have to spend will be worth the payoff. 

"In this example, a clown fish [like Nemo] and Dory would not actually be a sufficient meal for a great white shark like Bruce," who would prefer to go after a seal, she said. 

A human would probably not make the cut either.

Some sharks are omnivorous, but not those in "Finding Nemo"

Sharks in "Finding Nemo" might want to fight their urges to eat fish, but it's not in their nature. 

"Of the sharks in the scene, which are the great white shark, the shortfin mako, and the hammerhead, none of these sharks are omnivorous or vegetarian," she said.  

"There are a couple of different types of omnivorous sharks. My favorite example is the bonnethead, which actually eats seagrass in addition to crabs," per Webber-Schultz.

Megalodons died out long ago

In "The Meg," a 2018 movie staring Jason Statham, scientists discover a megalodon, a prehistoric giant shark, lurking in the depths of the Mariana trench. 

The problem is that this shark has been extinct for a very long time, "despite this movie making you believe that they might maybe somewhere be real," said Webber-Schultz.

"They make the shark around 75 feet long, although newer research is showing that megalodons were probably closer to around 60 feet," she said. 

It's difficult to estimate the exact length of a megalodon because we have to rely on rare bone fragments. Cartilage, which makes up most of a shark, does not fossilize. 

Beyond its size, the shark is also not anatomically correct. Sharks have "between five and seven gill slits," said Webber-Schultz 

"There's, like, eight gill slits on this thing, and it drives me bonkers," she said. 

Sharks don't tend to pull their victims down into the water

"The Meg" also shows the giant prehistoric shark grabbing onto and dragging down an unrealistic glass shark cage. Although it's impossible to say what sharks would have done back then, looking at today's animals, it's very unlikely. 

"Sharks are not that crazy about dragging their prey along to eat it. They will typically take a big bite and shake their head to create this gouging motion to get a chunk off and then swallow it," said Webber-Schultz.

You can watch Insider's full video with Webber-Schultz here:

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151 Jaws Trivia Questions (And Answers) That Are Razor Sharp

Team Kidadl

on 08 January 2021

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‘Jaws’, 1975, is an American horror/ thriller movie.

The film, directed by Steven Spielberg, is an adaptation of the novel by Peter Benchley’s ‘Jaws’. It is one of the highest-grossing films in the history of cinema.  

The plot depicts the story of a trio who sets out to kill the great white who has been attacking beachgoers. It was the first major motion picture to be shot on the ocean and gained great recognition immediately.

Encouraged by the success of the Shark Trivia and 80s Movie Trivia , a rich set of 150+ questions on ‘Jaws’ awaits you. Are you up for the ultimate quiz? Well, then buckle up and go ahead!

Jaws Movie Trivia Questions

Were you one of the massive ‘Jaws’ fandom back in the day? How precise can you be with this Jaws trivia? How carefully do you remember the details of this work of art by Spielberg? Chop chop! Answer all the jaws trivia quiz correctly to know!

1. Question: What is the name of the Shark ?

Answer: Bruce

2. Question: Who is Quint?

Answer: Shark hunter

3. Question: Where does the plot begin?

Answer: The beach.

4. Question: What is the boat called?

Answer: Orca.

5. Question: What does Chief Brody toss into the Shark’s mouth as it starts entering the sinking boat?

Answer: Oxygen tank

6. Question: Who are the main three?

Answer: Martin Brody, Matt Hooper, and Quint.

7. Question: What causes the Police Chief Brody to accept that the beach is no longer safe for the public?

Answer: The shark attack on Alex Kintner.

8. Question: Who is Ben Gardner?

Answer: A local fisherman

9. Question: How many sons does Chief Brody have?

10. Question: Who among the trio has an aversion towards water?

Answer: Martin Brody

11. Who plays Matt Hooper?

Answer: Richard Dreyfuss

12. Question: Name the island.

Answer: Amity Island

13. Question: What are the names of Martin Brody’s two sons?

Answer: Michael Brody and Sean Brody.

14. Question: Who was the first shark attack victim?

Answer: Chrissie Watkins

15. Question: Where do the events take place?

16. Question: What is written in white on the hoarding for Amity Island at the beginning of the picture?

Answer: 50th Annual Regatta July 4th-10th

17. Question: The full shark is seen at what time mark?

Answer: An hour and 21 minutes into the movie.

18. Question: Why does Martin Brody want to close down the beaches?

Answer: Due to the shark attacks.

19. Question: Why does Quint smash the radio?

Answer: He did not want to deviate from his task at hand – to kill the Shark.

20. Question: Who is Alex Kintner?

Answer: The second victim.

21. Question: Do they catch the culprit in the beginning?

Answer: No. They catch a tiger shark instead.

22. Question: Why does Alex’s mother blame Martin Brody?

Answer: Due to Brody’s failure in taking measures against the attacks.

23. Question: What does the mayor say ‘Amity’ means?

Answer: Friendship

24. Question: Whose corpse is revealed as Hooper inspects the abandoned boat?

Answer: Ben Gardener

25. Question: What kind of ornamentation is found in Quint’s home?

Answer: Shark jaws

26. Question: Who plays the cameo role of a newscaster?

Answer: Peter Benchley

27. Question: What indoor game is Hooper seen playing on the boat?

Answer: Cards

28. Question: Who said the line, “Not like going down to the pond and chasing bluegills and tommycods”?

Answer: Quint.

29. Question: What is the occupation of Matt Hooper?

Answer: Oceanographer

30. Question: Who among the trio dies?

Answer: Quint

31. Question: What does Hooper tie to the spear before firing it into the Shark?

Answer: A yellow barrel

32. Question: Who gets inside the shark cage?

Answer: Matt Hooper

33. Question: Do the trio plan to poison the Shark?

Answer: Yes

34. Question: How does Quint die?

Answer: Shark attack

35. Question: What is the total number of shark deaths that occurred?

36. Question: The trio estimated the Shark to be how long?

Answer: 25 feet.

37. Question: How did the trio kill the Shark?

Answer: Shooting it with a rifle after tossing in an oxygen tank into its mouth.

38. Question: Who was the one who really killed the Shark?

39. Question: Who played the role of Martin Brody?

Answer: Roy Scheider

40. Question: The famous line, "You're gonna need a bigger boat,” was uttered by -?

Answer: Scheider

41. Question: Which famous actor portrayed the character of Quint?

Answer: Robert Shaw

42. Which actor portrayed the character of Ben Gardner?

Answer: Craig Kingsbury

43. Question: Does Charlie die in an attempt to catch the great white?

Answer: No.

44. Question: What makes Ellen Brody agree with Martin Brody and yell “out of the water now!”?

Answer: She happens to notice a picture of a shark attacking a boat and realizes her husband was right.

45. Question: As Quint sings, how old does he say Mary Lee was when she died?

Answer: 103 years old

46. Question: What celebration is happening on Amity Island?

Answer: The 4th of July

47. Question: What was the color of the curtains seen in Brody’s house?

Answer: Yellow

48. Question: Who is Tippet?

Answer: A dog

49. Question: “Amity is a summer town. We need summer dollars”. Who says these lines?

Answer: Mayor Larry Vaughn

50. Question: What is seen written in the vehicle Chief Brody drives off in at the beginning of the movie?

Answer: “Amity Police Dept.”

51. Question: What does Brody’s wife ask if he took as he is about to board the boat Hooper and Quint?

Answer: Dramamine

52. Question: What color tee is Mr. Quint seen wearing when Hooper and Brody visit his home?

Answer: Grey.

53. Question: Where does the boy who entailed Chrissie Watkins to the waters before she died say he is from?

Answer: Hartford

54. Question: What solution does Hooper suggest to confirm if they had the real Shark?

Answer: Hooper suggested they cut open the creature and see what was inside its stomach.

55. Question: Does Quint die in the film?

Answer: Yes.

56. Question: Where does Ellen Brody say she put the extra pair of glasses at?

Answer: In his black socks.

57. Question: How does Brody reply to Hooper asking him how his day was?

Answer: “Swell.”

58. Question: At what length in the water do most people get attacked by sharks?

Answer: In three feet of water from about 10 feet off the beach.

59. Question: What is the color of the couch inside the boat?

Answer: Red

60. Question: When Quint says he caught a 16-footer off Montauk once, how many barrels does he say he had to stick in it in order to bring it down?

61. Question: What food item does Hooper offer Brody while they are on the boat?

Answer: A pretzel

62. Question: What is the color of the box Quint opens in the boat?

Answer: Dark green

63. Question: What item does Quint say he’s seen a shark eat before?

Answer: A rocking chair

64. Question: Who amongst the trio is seen constantly eating?

Answer: Mr. Quint

65. Question: As Quint opens his box, how many sets of rope is seen in it?

66. Question: Where in the film was the word ‘LOWRANCE’ written?

Answer: On the fish finder in the boat.

67. Question: What does ‘the porker’ refer to in the movie?

Answer: The great white Shark

68. Question: What is the color of the helicopter seen flying around the beach?

69. Question: What creature does Hooper say bit through his wetsuit?

Answer: A moray eel

70. Question: Who is said to have taken part in an arm-wrestling contest?

71. Question: Where does Quint say the arm wrestling contest was held?

Answer: San Francisco

72. Question: What drink was Quint drinking?

Answer: Narragansett Beer

73. Question: After Quint finishes his drink, he throws the can away - true or false?

Answer: False. He crushes it.

74. Question: Which animal dies of a shark attack?

Jaws Trivia Facts

Jaws is one of the most popular horror films of all time.

You may be a master of the plot but want to know how well you are aware of the truth of the events that happened around the entire making of the movie? Dive into these Jaws facts trivia now!

75. Question: The shooting took place during which all months of the year?

Answer: May and June

76. Question: What was the combined cost of the mechanical sharks?

Answer: $225,000

77. Question: During filming whose head got stuck in the mechanical Shark’s mouth?

Answer: Star director, George Lucas

78. Question: Which year did the film ‘Jaws’ come out?

Answer: 1975

79. Question: Whose dog did a cameo in the film?

Answer: Spielberg’s dog Elma made a cameo appearance as Martin Brody’s dog.

80. Question: Which director was previously set to direct the film, ‘Jaws’?

Answer: Dick Richards

81. Question: What were the other names proposed by the author, Peter Benchley, for his book ‘Jaws’?

Answer: “Silence in the Water”, “Wha’s That Noshin’ On My Laig”, “The Jaws of Leviathan”.

82. Question: Steven Spielberg was not present during the shot of the final scene in the film – true or false?

Answer: True.

83. Question: Where did Scheider first learn of the role?

Answer: At a party, he happened to hear Steven Spielberg talking about it.

84. Question: At what location did Steven Spielberg re-shoot the scene where the corpse of Ben Gardner was discovered?

Answer: In Verna Fields’ swimming pool.

85. Question: How much did the film make in the box office?

Answer: A record of $471 million

86. Question: The movie is widely said to be the favorite movie of which Cuban personality?

Answer: Fidel Castro

87. Question: Which are the sole 2 notes used in the much popular ‘Jaws’ theme score, by John Williams?

Answer: E and F

88. Question: Spielberg and Dreyfuss wanted to be a part of 'Jaws 2' but was unable to due to their commitment to another movie. Which was the movie?

Answer: 'Close Encounters'.

89. Question: Charlton Heston almost played the part of Martin Brody – True or false?

Answer: True

90. Question: The film, ‘Jaws’, by Steven Spielberg is rated PG-13 – true or false?

Answer: False. The film is rated PG even after this work of art features some pretty gruesome scenes and shots.

91. Question: Who were the sharks named after?

Answer: After Bruce Ramer, Steven Spielberg’s lawyer.

92. Question: How old was Steven Spielberg when he directed ‘Jaws’?

Answer: 28 years.

93. Question: Was the line “You’re gonna need a bigger boat”, improvised?

Answer: Yes, by Roy Scheider

94. Questions: How much did the mechanical sharks weigh?

Answer: 1.2 tons

95. Question: Who helped Robert Shaw with his accent for the movie?

96. Question: Into which character’s dialogues did the respective actor incorporate old sea stories told in the set by Craig Kingsbury?

97. Question: What true incident was ‘Jaws’ inspired by?

Answer: Active warfare against a killer shark in New Jersey, 1916.

98. Question: What character did Murry Hamilton play?

99. Question: ‘Jaws’ began its production fully prepared – true or false?

Answer: False. The film began its production without a script, cast and sharks.

100. Question: The real Shark featured in the film came from which part of the globe?

Answer: Florida

101. Question: What type of Shark is Jaws?

Jaws Four Trivia

Sure you’re the unbeatable jaws fan? Answer these and see for yourself!

102. Question: Name the 4th film of 'Jaws'.

Answer: ‘Jaws: The Revenge’

103. Question: In which ‘Jaws’ movie does Michael Cain star?

104. Question: What makes the Shark explode in the fourth ‘Jaws’ film?

Answer: The jolt of electricity, sent by Micheal, causes the Shark to leap out of the water, in immense pain.

105. Question: Who is the returning character and actor from the previous ‘Jaws’ films, ‘Jaws and ‘Jaws 2’, to ‘Jaws 4’?

Answer: The character of Ellen Brody, played by Lorraine Gary.

106. Question: Who directed the fourth Jaws movie?

Answer: Joseph Sargent

107: Question: Why did Micheal Cain agree to star in the fourth ‘Jaws’ movie?

Answer: Cain was lured in by the idea of having to shoot it in the Caribbean and also made a vacation out of it with his family.

108. Question: The number of shark deaths in ‘Jaws 4’ is?

Jaws Three Trivia

Are you saying you haven't missed any from the series? Let’s see how well you were watching.

109. Question: When did the film ‘Jaws 3-D’ come out?

Answer: The year 1983

110. Question: Who directed Jaws 3-D?

Answer: Joe Alves

111. Question: Which Academy Award winner starred in ‘Jaws’ 3?

Answer: Louis Gossett Jr.

112. Question: In which year was the original sharks movie ‘Jaws’ released?

113. Question: Where did the film ‘Jaws 3-D’ take place?

Answer: Sea World Amusement park

114. Question: Who is the author of the bestselling novel ‘Jaws’, from which the first film was adapted?

115. Question: The number of shark deaths in ‘Jaws 3’ is?

Jaws two Trivia

Was looking out for every detail in the series a piece of cake for you? Get this quiz right to know if you’re the No.1 fan!

116. Question: Who amongst the cast claimed that they were at a point circled by real-life hammerhead sharks?

Answer: Marc Gilpin

117. Question: What was ‘Jaws 2’s popular tagline?

Answer: "Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water . . . "

118. Question: The film was briefly the highest-grossing sequel in history until Rocky II (1979) was released the succeeding year - true or false?

119. Question: Who coined the tagline of the film, "Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water . . . "?

Answer: Andrew J. Kuehn

120. Question: While shooting ‘Jaws 2’, a different location other than Martha’s vineyard was selected - true or false?

Answer: False. The production crew stuck to shooting at Martha’s Vineyard as their perfect backdrop.

121. Question: Who co-wrote ‘Jaws’ 2?

Answer: Carl Gottlieb

122. Question: Who was the music composer?

Answer: John Williams

123. Question: The number of shark deaths in ‘Jaws 2” is?

124. Question: How much did Jaws 2 cost the studio?

Answer: $30 million

125. Question: Jaws 2 came out the same day as which other blockbuster movie?

Answer: Grease

126. Question: In the second part of the series, what does Brody mistake a school of bluefish for?

Answer: Sharks

127. Question: Who plays the role of Jackie Peters?

Answer: Donna Wilkes

128. Question: Where does Brody, Sean, and Jackie await rescue at the end of the plot?

Answer: Cable Junction

Hardest 'Jaws' Filming Trivia

We agree you know about the movie, but how well versed are you when it comes to the behind the scenes of this all-time thriller? The interesting facts and the lesser-known ones, we have it all. Get through this intense round of Jaws trivia to check how hardcore a Jaws fan you are!

129. Question: Who designed ‘Jaws’ iconic poster image?

Answer: Roger Kastel

130. Question: Who composed the iconic ‘Jaws’ theme music?

Answer: John Williams.

131. Question: Who was thrown off the set of the film one day of shooting after disagreeing with the climax?

132. Question: What happened to the boat used in the movie?

Answer: It sank.

133. Question: Where was the movie filmed?

Answer: Martha’s Vineyard.

134. Question: Who were the two shark experts hired for the movie?

Answer: Ron and Valeri Taylor

135. Question: In the movie, what role does Lorraine Gary play?

Answer: Ellen Brody, wife of Martin Brody.

136. Question: Who directed ‘Jaws’?

Answer: Steven Spielberg

137. Question: The Indianapolis monologue by Quint was put in the shot by whom?

Answer: Screenwriter, Howard Sackler

138. Question: Who initially turned down the offer for one of the lead roles of the movie?

139. Question: Where is Martha’s Vineyard located?

Answer: Massachusetts

140. Question: Shooting the film was only supposed to take 52 days, although it went on for how many days?

Answer: 155 days.

141. Question: Jaws’ ending was a nod to which the previous movie of Spielberg’s?

Answers: ‘Duel’

142. Question: Who was the first choice to play the role of the character, fisherman Quint?

Answer: Lee Marvin

143. Questions: How come Steven Spielberg moved the production to Martha’s Vineyard?

Answer: Due to the stormy weather in Nantucket, the place Spielberg previously planned on shooting at.

144. Question: How many mechanical sharks were used for the film?

145. Question: The line, "You're gonna need a bigger boat”, in Steven Spielberg’s film, ‘Jaws’, was improvised by whom?

146. Question: All the three mechanical sharks used the same names in the film by Steven Spielberg - true or false?

147. This movie is the only movie John Williams and Steven Spielberg worked together for - true or false?

Answer: False. The big white’s thriller movie ‘Jaws’ was only the second movie that featured their collaboration, and they'd do many more films together.

148. Question: Who was the director of photography for the series?

Answer: Bill Butler

149. Question: John Williams won the Academy Award for the Best Original Score for which ‘Jaws’ movie?

Answer: ‘Jaws’

150. Question: Steven Spielberg was hired to be director because of which of his previous works?

Answer: 'Duel'

151. Question: Who thought ‘Jaws’ would destroy his/her career?

We hope you enjoyed this Jaws trivia, why not look at scary movies trivia or animal trivia.

The Kidadl Team is made up of people from different walks of life, from different families and backgrounds, each with unique experiences and nuggets of wisdom to share with you. From lino cutting to surfing to children’s mental health, their hobbies and interests range far and wide. They are passionate about turning your everyday moments into memories and bringing you inspiring ideas to have fun with your family.

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Can You Ace This “Jaws” Quiz?

Can You Ace This “Jaws” Quiz?

About This Quiz

Think you know all there is to know about the 1975 movie "Jaws?" Take this quiz to find out just how much you remember.

If you read the book "Jaws" by Peter Benchley, you would probably have agreed that it would make a great movie. But, no one could have anticipated that a mechanical shark could have inspired so much fear in beachgoers that they avoided the nation's beaches for months.

Who knew that a movie with a budget of a mere $9 million would end up grossing over $470 million (the highest ever until the release of "Star Wars" in 1977)? In fact, the movie almost made back its production costs in the first weekend.

"Jaws" pushed movie boundaries in several ways, mainly in its use of suspense. However, the technique Spielberg used in the movie wasn't intentional, but rather the result of those crazy mechanical sharks. Unfortunately for Spielberg, the sharks did not always cooperate, often refusing to work at all, so he was forced to use sound, specifically music, to let viewers know that the shark was near. This type of suspenseful play was a technique used heavily by Alfred Hitchcock, and it certainly worked for Spielberg... and millions of viewers. 

If you're ready to swim with the big fish, take this quiz.

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Jaws  Quizzes, Trivia and Puzzles

Jaws Trivia and Quizzes

Fun Trivia

12 .   Another Bite of 'Jaws' - 10 questions - 3 mins Another Bite! Average , 10 Qns, dorisbumble, May 12 06 Average dorisbumble 5248 plays

13 .   The "Jaws" Movies - 5 questions - 3 mins Trivia on different "Jaws" movies. Average , 5 Qns, Finster69, Mar 21 06 Average Finster69 5762 plays

10 Jaws Facts You Never Knew

Jaws is one of the all-time classic blockbusters that started it all. Swimming around, we found some facts about Steven Spielberg's movie you never knew.

We're gonna need a bigger budget. Steven Spielberg's Jaws went on to invent the summer blockbuster, alongside Star Wars from his pal George Lucas, which arrived two years later. But Jaws began as a troubled production that went way over budget and made Spielberg fear for his job. Here we'll take a look at 10 things you never knew about Jaws .

A shark by any other name.

Perhaps some of the best-known behind-the-scenes trivia from Jaws is the nickname the cast and crew gave to the 25-foot great white shark at the movie's center, which was played by three full-scale mechanical models. Bruce. Yes, Bruce. The nickname was a good-natured tribute to Spielberg's lawyer, Bruce Ramer, who has represented the filmmaker for decades. Clint Eastwood and Robert Zemeckis are also longtime clients. After numerous malfunctions resulted in repeated production delays, Spielberg devised another nickname for the shark, too: the Great White Turd.

The famous score.

Who hasn't sat down at a piano at some point and tapped out the sinister two-note theme from Jaws , a deceptively simple piece of music filled with dread and foreboding? Well, the first time composer John Williams tickled it on the ivories in front of Steven Spielberg the director thought he must be joking. The director would later credit the theme with much of the movie's success. Jaws marked the second collaboration between Spielberg and Williams and but one of the composer's many famous themes which include Star Wars, Superman: The Movie, and Indiana Jones.

The other Chief Brodys.

Roy Scheider, who improvised the film's most famous line ("we're gonna need a bigger boat"), actually wasn't the producers' first choice for Chief Martin Brody. Among those courted were Robert Duvall, who reprised his role as Tom Hagen in The Godfather Part II the year before Jaws , and screen legend Charlton Heston.

The other Captain Quints.

Robert Duvall wasn't the only Godfather cast member who could have been in Jaws . Sterling Hayden, who played corrupt Irish-American cop Captain McClusky in The Godfather, was offered the role of Captain Quint. Before Robert Shaw was cast, producers also went after World War II veteran Lee Marvin, famous for playing various hardboiled soldiers, cowboys, and police detectives in film and television.

The other Matt Hoopers.

Before Richard Dreyfus was cast as marine biologist Matt Hooper, there were discussions with Jeff Bridges, who starred in 2010's Spielberg-produced True Grit. The studio also reportedly wanted Jan Michael Vincent, but Spielberg fought for Dreyfus, 'though he had to do much convincing of the actor himself along the way.

The shrunken shark cage.

A second unit captured real footage of sharks off the coast of Australia. But since the sharks were much smaller than the movie's title villain, they used a deceptively smaller shark cage, with a wetsuit-clad 4 foot 9 former jockey standing in as Hooper.

Speaking of real sharks...

The production flew in a 13-foot tiger shark caught off the coast of Florida to use for the scene where the townspeople string up a shark on the dock thought to be the shark. The real life locals were unable to catch a shark that big, but flying one in had its problems, too. By the time they were filming, that shark corpse was going rotten.

Hooper's love affair.

In order to keep the story lean and mean, Spielberg tossed out different subplots from the source material. In the novel, Hooper has an affair with the chief's wife, Ellen, played by Lorraine Gary, who returned for Jaws 2 and Jaws: The Revenge .

Hooper dies in the book.

The love affair for the Richard Dreyfus character may have been cut but so was his death. Hooper's death in the book made it into the script, but not the finished cut. That second unit in Australia captured fantastic footage of the sharks attacking the empty shark cage, so Hooper was allowed to escape in the film so they could make use of it, rather than having the shark bite through it and kill him as planned.

A few more differences...

There are a number of other changes from the book. Here are a few of them: Amity is a town in Long Island in the book, not New England. Brody is a local, not an outsider. The Brodys have three kids, not two. Quint gets his leg caught in a harpoon rope and drowns. The shark dies of exhaustion, rather than from an explosion.

We hope you learned something from this look at 10 Things You Never Knew, or at least maybe never knew, about Jaws . There are a number of great Jaws documentaries out there to satiate your shark like craving for more information about the endlessly re-watchable blockbuster thriller. Like many Reddit users, we highly recommend The Shark is Still Working.

The documentary is a labor of love from J. Michael Roddy, who helped create JawsFest on Martha's Vineyard . It includes sit-down interviews with Spielberg, Dreyfus, John Williams, the late David Brown and Richard Zanuck, and the last interview with author Peter Benchley before he passed away. Scheider even offered to narrate, recording all of his parts just a few months before he died. Jaws loving filmmakers in the doc include M. Night Shyamalan, Kevin Smith, and Bryan Singer.

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100 Movie Trivia Questions (and Answers) All Movie Lovers Should Know

Kelly Kuehn

Put your film knowledge to the test and see how many movie trivia questions you can get right. Plus, learn bonus facts about your favorite movies!

How many of these movie trivia questions can you answer correctly.

Consider yourself a film aficionado? If so, these trivia questions are for you. There’s a wide range of trivia questions here, from specific movie questions (including some Star Wars trivia ) to general movie knowledge. Sit back, grab the popcorn, and see how many movie trivia questions you get right—no peeking at the answers! Don’t forget to check out these trivia questions for kids —they’ll liven up your family game night.

FILM 'THE MATRIX' BY ANDY AND LARRY WACHOWSKI

The code in The Matrix comes from what food recipes?

A. Sushi recipes

B. Dumpling recipes

C. Stir-fry recipes

D. Pad thai recipes

Answer : Sushi recipes

Bonus fact : A production designer scanned symbols from his wife’s sushi cookbooks, then manipulated them to create the iconic “code.”

What’s the name of Meatloaf’s character in The Rocky Horror Picture Show ?

Answer : Eddie

Titanic - 1997

Who actually drew the sketch of Rose in Titanic ?

A . Leonardo DiCaprio

B . Billy Zane

C . James Cameron

D . Kathy Bates

Answer : James Cameron

Bonus fact : Unlike Jack’s French girls, Kate Winslet wore a bathing suit while Cameron sketched the picture.

Who voices Joy in Pixar’s Inside Out ?

A . Tina Fey

B . Kathryn Hahn

C . Ellen DeGeneres

D . Amy Poehler

Answer : Amy Poehler

RELATED : Disney Trivia: How Well Do You Know Your Favorite Disney Movies?

Where were The Lord of the Rings movies filmed?

A . Ireland

B . Iceland

C . New Zealand

D . Australia

Answer : New Zealand

RELATED : 13 Hidden Messages in the Lord of the Rings Trilogy You Never Noticed

Which country does Forrest Gump travel to as part of the All-American Ping-Pong Team?

A . Vietnam

Answer : China

Pulp Fiction - 1994

Which famous Pulp Fiction scene was filmed backward?

A.  Vincent and Mia’s dance scene

B.  Mia’s overdose scene

C.  The royale with cheese scene

D. The Ezekiel 25:17 scene

Answer : Mia’s overdose scene

Bonus fact : When Uma Thurman’s character is having an overdose, it looks like John Travolta sticks a needle in her to revive her. Actually, Travolta pulled the needle out , and the film was run backward to reverse the action.

Which actor was in the following movies: The Outsiders , Wayne’s World , and Tommy Boy ?

A . Tom Cruise

B . Matt Dillon

C . Rob Lowe

D . C. Thomas Howell

Answer : Rob Lowe

Who was the first Black person to win an Oscar?

A . Hattie McDaniel

B . Sidney Poitier

C . Dorothy Dandridge

D . James Earl Jones

Answer : Hattie McDaniel

Bonus Fact : McDaniel won the Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role in 1939 for her role as Mammy in Gone with the Wind . 

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

Which is not the name of a child selected to tour the Wonka factory in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory ?

A. Billy Warp

B. Veruca Salt

C.  Mike Teavee

D.  Charlie Bucket

Answer : Billy Warp

Freddy Krueger wears a striped sweater that is which colors?

A . Red and blue

B . Orange and green

C . Red and green

D . Orange and brown

Answer : Red and green

RELATED : The 35 Scariest Movies of All Time

The Godfather - 1972

Who did the cat in The Godfather belong to?

A. Francis Ford Coppola

B.  Diane Keaton

C.  Al Pachino

D. No one—the cat was a stray

Answer : No one—the cat was a stray.

Bonus fact : Director Francis Ford Coppola found the cat in the studio and handed it to Marlon Brando before the shot. The cat loved the actor so much that it stayed in his lap and purred so loudly that the crew was afraid the noise would drown out the dialogue.

RELATED : Can You Answer These 14 Dictionary Questions from Jeopardy?

What is the name of the fictional land where Frozen takes place?

A . Arendelle

Answer : Arendelle

MGM 2001 Movie Previews

What score did Elle Woods get on her LSAT in Legally Blonde ?

Answer : 179

Which movie is this famous line from: “I wish I knew how to quit you.”

A . Love Actually

B . How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days

C . Brokeback Mountain

D . The Notebook 

Answer : Brokeback Mountain

RELATED : 50 of the Most Famous Movie Quotes of All Time

What was the top-grossing movie of 2014?

A . The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1

B . The Lego Movie

C . Captain America: The Winter Soldier 

D . Guardians of the Galaxy

Answer : Guardians of the Galaxy

Never Say Never Again - 1983

True or false: Sean Connery wore a toupee in every James Bond movie

Answer : True

Bonus fact : If you think the dreamy 007 seemed too good to be true, you’re right. Sean Connery started balding at age 17.

RELATED : The 12 Best Spy Movies You Should Watch Again

How old was Stockard Channing when she played high school student Rizzo in Grease ?

Answer : 33

Who directed the hit 2017 movie Get Out ?

A . James Wan

B . Jordan Peele

C . Guillermo del Toro

D . Tim Story

Answer : Jordan Peele

Fight Club - 1999

What item is in every Fight Club scene?

A.  A Coca-Cola can

B.  A Starbucks cup

C.  A Dunkin’ donut

D.  A Pepsi bottle

Answer : A Starbucks cup

If you watch the Marvel movies in chronological order, which movie would you watch first?

A . Iron Man

B . Captain America: The First Avenger 

C . Doctor Strange

D . Captain Marvel

Answer : Captain America: The First Avenger 

Mike Myers In 'Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me'

Which is the first movie in the Austin Powers franchise?

A. Austin Powers: Spy of the World 

B. Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me 

C.  Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery 

D. Austin Powers in Goldmember 

Answer : Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery 

Which movie is this quote from: “Here’s looking at you, kid.”

A . Breakfast at Tiffany’s 

B . Citizen Kane

C . Casablanca 

D . Notorious 

Answer : Casablanca 

What is the name of the camp where counselors are terrorized by a slasher in Friday the 13th ?

A . Camp Holland Lake

B . Camp Crystal Lake

C . Camp Diamond Lake

D . Camp Green Lake

Answer : Camp Crystal Lake

Jurassic Park III - 2001

Some of the velociraptor noises in Jurassic Park are actually which animals mating?

A. Tortoises

D. Crocodiles

Answer : Tortoises

Bonus fact : At least that’s what the sound designer used when the raptors were communicating. Other scenes of the species used horse breathing and goose hisses.

Which actor hasn’t played the Joker?

A . Jack Nicholson

B . Sean Penn

C . Jared Leto

D . Mark Hamil

Answer : Sean Penn

Which country was the 2017 movie Call Me By Your Name filmed?

D . Morocco

Answer : Italy

RELATED : 40 Best LGBTQ Movies Everyone Should Watch

The Sandlot

The dog in The Sandlot is nicknamed “The Beast.” What’s the dog’s actual name?

A . Hercules

B . Goliath

Answer : Hercules

RELATED : 75 Classic Family Movies Everyone Will Enjoy

Which singer starred alongside Steve Martin in 2006’s remake of The Pink Panther ?

A . Beyoncé

B . Britney Spears

C . Rihanna

D . Mariah Carey

Answer : Beyoncé

Which two movies started from the same script?

A.  Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind 

B.  E.T. and Poltergeist 

C. The Goonies and Indiana Jones

D.  Jurassic Park and The Land Before Time

Answer : E.T. and Poltergeist 

Bonus fact : Steven Spielberg was going to produce filmmaker John Sayles’ Night Skies script about a rural family invaded by aliens that could kill with a touch of the finger but decided to go a more family-friendly route with the story by creating E.T. The Extra Terrestrial . Sayles wouldn’t rewrite the script, but Spielberg kept the idea for Poltergeist .

US-film-celebrity-Hollywood-Celebrities-cinema-movie

How many Oscars has Halle Berry won?

True or false: speed is the only movie sandra bullock and keanu reeves have starred in together.

Answer : False

Bonus fact : They also starred in 2006’s The Lake House together.

Which movie is this quote from: “What’s in the box?”

B . Reservoir Dogs

C . The Boondock Saints 

Answer : Se7en 

In Mean Girls , Cady moves to Illinois from which continent?

A. Australia

Answer : Africa

Halloween - Curse Of Michael Myers - 1995

Michael Myers’ mask in Halloween is which actor’s face?

A.  Clint Eastwood

B.  Marlon Brando

C.  Paul Newman

D. William Shatner

Answer : William Shatner

Bonus fact : Specifically, it was his Star Trek character, Captain Kirk. There wasn’t money in the 1978 horror film’s budget to create a custom mask, so the art director bought a clown and a Captain Kirk mask. The crew spray-painted it white and adjusted the eyes and hair to create the terrifying mask.

Which movie was not directed by Tim Burton?

A . The Witches 

B . Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure 

C . Corpse Bride

D . Big Fish

Answer : The Witches 

Which movie does not feature Emma Stone?

A . Superbad

C . The Help

D . No Strings Attached

Answer : No Strings Attached

Toy Story , Woody (Character)

What object was Toy Story ’s Woody originally?

A. A ventriloquist dummy

B.  A puppet

C.  A clown doll

D.  A nesting doll

Answer: A ventriloquist dummy

Bonus fact : Even in later versions, Woody was written as a “sarcastic bully” trying to rally the other toys against Buzz. Luckily, the studio decided to transform him into a more lovable character.

Who directed Silence of the Lambs ?

A . Wes Anderson

B . Jonathan Demme

C . Oliver Stone

D . Christopher Nolan

Answer : Jonathan Demme

Which isn’t a core rule for handling a Mogwai in Gremlins ?

A . Do not feed it after midnight

B . Do not expose it to bright lights

C . Do not let it get wet

D . Do not let it get cold

Answer : Do not let it get cold

The Terminator - 1984

Which professional athlete was considered for the lead in The Terminator ?

A.  Dan Marino

B.  Mike Tyson

C. O.J. Simpson

D. Wayne Gretzky

Answer: O.J. Simpson

Bonus fact : Director James Cameron rejected the choice because he didn’t think the “this likable, goofy, kind of innocent guy” could pull off a cyborg assassin.

True or false: The Shining  was Stephen King’s first novel to be adapted into a movie

Bonus Fact : 1976’s Carrie was actually the first movie to be adapted from a Stephen King novel.

RELATED : The Best Stephen King Quotes

' MONSTERS INC ' FILM PREMIERE, EL CAPITAN THEATRE, HOLLYWOOD, LOS ANGELES, AMERICA - 28 OCT 2001

How old was the voice actress of Monster Inc. ’s Boo at the time of production?

B. Two and a half

Answer : Two and a half

Bonus fact : At two and a half, Mary Gibbs had trouble sitting still through the scenes, so the crew would follow her around with a microphone. They’d tickle her or take candy away to make her laugh or cry, so the emotions are as real as they sound.

Who took home an Oscar for Best Actor in 1998?

A . Matt Damon

B . Jack Nicholson

C . Liam Neeson

D . Sean Penn

Answer : Jack Nicholson

Bonus fact : Nicholson won the award for his performance in As Good as It Gets. 

Raiders Of The Lost Ark - 1981

Which Star Wars characters appear in Indiana Jones ?

A. R2-D2 and C-3PO

B.  Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia

C.  Yoda and Obi-Wan Kenobi

D.  Han Solo and Chewbacca

Answer : R2-D2 and C-3PO

Bonus fact : Look closely at the scenery in Raiders of the Lost Ark and you’ll notice hieroglyphics with the robots’ likeness in two scenes.

Who plays lawyer-turned-youth-hockey-coach Gordon Bombay in The Mighty Ducks franchise?

A . Denzel Washington

B . Charlie Sheen

C . Emilio Estevez

D . Tim Allen

Answer : Emilio Estevez

Gone With The Wind - 1939

True or false: Gone With the Wind ’s fire scene is old sets being burned

Bonus fact : The filmmakers had to get rid of the old sets to make room for the new movie’s scenery anyway, so burning them and filming it as “Atlanta” going down in flames accomplished both. The filmmakers are lucky it worked—they shot the blaze even before the movie’s cast was confirmed.

In The Ring , how long do people have to live after they watch a cursed videotape?

A . Three days

B . Seven days

C . Five days

D . One day

Answer : Seven days

Jaws - 1975

Which famous line from Jaws was ad-libbed?

A.  “I used to hate the water.”

B.  “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

C.  “All this machine does is swim, and eat, and make little sharks.”

D. “You know, a thing about a shark, he’s got…lifeless eyes. Black eyes, like a doll’s eyes!”

Answer : “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

Bonus fact : First of all, the line was “You’re gonna need a bigger boat,” not “we’re,” as it’s often misquoted. The line wasn’t in the original script but was an inside joke among the Jaws crew, teasing the stingy producers for picking a support boat that was too small to hold the equipment. Actor Roy Scheider ad-libbed the line throughout filming, but the one kept in the final cut became one of the most remembered movie quotes of all time.

RELATED : 15 Famous Movie Quotes Everyone Gets Wrong

True or False: James Earl Jones voices Mufasa in 1994’s The Lion King

RELATED : The Surprising Reason Mufasa and Scar Weren’t Actually Brothers

Los Angeles, California, USA, February 26, 2017: Warner Bros Harry Potter broom

A Harry Potter stunt double was paralyzed on the job. Which actor did the stunt double do stunts for?

A. Rupert Grint

B.  Emma Watson

C.  Alan Rickman

D. Daniel Radcliffe

Answer : Daniel Radcliffe

Bonus fact : David Holmes did the stunt doubles for Daniel Radcliffe in every Harry Potter movie, but an accident during a flying broomstick scene in the last movie left him paralyzed from the neck down. Radcliffe organized a celebrity charity auction to pay for his medical bills, and Holmes now runs a production company with two other quadriplegic friends.

What song plays in the tunnel scene in Perks of Being a Wallflower ?

A . “Heroes” by David Bowie

B . “Imagine” by John Lennon

C . “There Is a Light That Never Goes Out” by The Smiths

D . “High and Dry” by Radiohead

Answer : “Heroes” by David Bowie

The Wizard Of Oz - 1939

True or false: Toto was paid more than the Munchkins in The Wizard of Oz

Bonus fact : The Munchkin actors received $50 a week—which was a good wage at the time—while the dog earned $125 a week.

Who plays Captain Steven Hiller in 1996’s blockbuster movie Independence Day ?

A . Will Smith

B . Samuel L. Jackson

C . Denzel Washington

D . Terry Crews

Answer : Will Smith

The set for which movie was buried underground for decades?

A.  Nosferatu

B. The Ten Commandments

C.  The Great Train Robbery

D.  Stagecoach 

Answer : The Ten Commandments

Bonus fact : Cecil B. DeMille, director of the 1923 silent film The Ten Commandments , thought the movie set—including 21 Sphinx replicas—was too valuable to let other filmmakers get their hands on it. He figured it was cheaper to bury the set than to move it, and the artifacts remained underground near the California coast for 94 years before archaeologists found the 300-pound head in 2017.

Jack Nicholson In 'The Shining'

Who played Wendy Torrance in The Shining ?

B . Shelley Duvall

C . Sissy Spacek

D . Linda Ronstadt

Answer : Shelley Duvall

Which was the first movie to show a toilet flushing?

B. Citizen Kane

C.  The Graduate 

D.  Vertigo 

Answer : Psycho

Bonus fact : At the time, the Motion Picture Production Code banned flushing toilets because it was considered filthy. Psycho was a key to putting the censoring code to an end.

Which movie was Spike Lee’s first feature film?

A . She’s Gotta Have It 

B . Do The Right Thing 

C . School Daze

D . Malcolm X

Answer : She’s Gotta Have It 

Django Unchained - Leonardo Dicaprio

True or false: In Django Unchained , Leonardo DiCaprio intentionally cut his hand during a scene

Bonus fact : During one of Leonardo DiCaprio’s big scenes in Django Unchained , his racist rant is heightened when he slams down on a table and cuts his hand on a glass. It might look like special effects, but it wasn’t in the script. The actor really did hurt his hand without stopping the scene, and the blood you see is real.

Which word completes this quote from Apocalypse Now : “I love the smell of ___ in the morning.”

A . Surrender

C . Gunfire

D . Victory

Answer : Napalm

Dracula - 1931

Dracula was filmed in English during the day, and in what other language at night?

Answer : Spanish

Bonus fact : When the 1931 movie Dracula was being shot, it was common for foreign-language films to take over the set at night and shoot their own versions instead of dubbing over them later. The Spanish-language version—which used the same script and set—wrapped up in about half the time and earned way better reviews than its English-language counterpart.

What karaoke song does Cameron Diaz’s character sing in My Best Friend’s Wedding ?

A . “I Just Don’t Know What I’d Do With Myself”

B . “I Will Always Love You”

C . “Stay”

D . “Could This Be Love”

Answer : “I Just Don’t Know What I’d Do With Myself”

It's A Wonderful Life, James Stewart

True or false: Jimmy Stewart did not want to do It’s a Wonderful Life

Bonus fact : The lead actor had returned from spending 15 months in World War II combat as a pilot and was considering quitting acting. He initially said a film about suicide was the last thing the country (and he, as someone dealing with PTSD) needed, but he reluctantly agreed. It’s a Wonderful Live ended up re-launching his acting career.

Which actor plays Private Ryan in Saving Private Ryan ?

A . Tom Hanks

B . Vin Disel

C . Edward Burns

D . Matt Damon

Answer : Matt Damon

Who is the youngest person to win an Oscar?

A. Jennifer Lawrence

B.  Mickey Rooney

C.  Haley Joel Osment

D.  Tatum O’Neal

Answer: Tatum O’Neal

Bonus fact : O’Neal was just 10 years old when she won the Oscar for Best Support Actress in 1974 for her performance in Paper Moon .

RELATED : Why Are the Academy Awards Also Called the Oscars?

True or false: Bradley Cooper’s first movie role was in 2005’s Wedding Crashers

Bonus fact : Cooper’s first movie role was actually in 2001’s Wet Hot American Summer. 

Jurassic Park

What is the name of Jeff Goldblum’s character in Jurassic Park ?

A . Dr. Ian Malcolm

B . Dr. Malcolm Stevens

C . Dr. Evan Malcolm

D . Dr. Michael Ian

Answer : Dr. Ian Malcolm

RELATED : Pop Culture Trivia Questions People Always Get Wrong

What is the highest-grossing movie of all time?

A. Titanic 

C. Avengers: Endgame 

D. Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Answer : Avatar 

Corey Feldman And Jamison Newlander In 'The Lost Boys'

Which movie was Corey Feldman not in?

A . Stand By Me

B . Fast Times at Ridgemont High

C . The Goonies

D . The Lost Boys

Answer : Fast Times at Ridgemont High

Who was originally cast to voice Shrek?

A . Bill Murray

B . Chris Farley

C . David Spade

D . Chris Rock

Answer : Chris Farley

Bonus Fact : After Farley passed away, Nicholas Cage was considered for the role of the beloved green ogre but turned it down.

2012 Vanity Fair Oscar Party

Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth first met on the set of which film?

A . Hannah Montana: The Movie

B . The Last Song

C . The Hunger Games 

D . Safe Haven

Answer : The Last Song

Which is the first movie in the Bourne franchise?

A . The Bourne Legacy

B . The Bourne Supremacy 

C . Jason Bourne 

D . The Bourne Identity 

Answer : The Bourne Identity 

True or false: Mickey Mouse has five fingers

Answer : False—Mickey Mouse has four fingers.

Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgundy Q&A

Which actor isn’t in Anchorman ?

A . Paul Rudd

B . Seth Rogen

C . David Koechner

D . Adam Scott

Answer : Adam Scott

Bonus fun fact : Even though Scott wasn’t featured in this Will Ferrell movie, he does act alongside Ferrell in 2008’s Step Brothers .

RELATED : The Best 100 Funny Movies of All Time

What are the names of the two people behind Ghostface in Scream ?

A . Billy and Steve

B . Bobby and Stu

C . Bobby and Steve

D . Billy and Stu

Answer : Billy and Stu

Bruce Willis In 'Die Hard'

What year was the first Die Hard movie released?

Answer : 1988

RELATED : 21 Movies That Have Hilarious Titles in Other Countries

2020 Winter TCA Tour - Day 7

Which movie does not feature Catherine O’Hara?

A . Nothing Personal 

B . The Nightmare Before Christmas

C . Beetlejuice 

D . City of Angels 

Answer : City of Angels

Who plays the convenience store clerk seen at the beginning of Juno ?

A . Bill Hader

B . Rainn Wilson

C . Andy Samberg

D . Jonah Hill

Answer : Rainn Wilson

Janet Gaynor and Frank Borzage with Academy Award

True or false: The first Academy Awards were handed out in 1925

Answer : False.

Bonus fact : They were first handed out in 1929.

Which movie stars Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet as a broken up couple who seek to erase memories of one another?

A . Memories 

B . It Had to Be You

C . Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Answer : Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

What was the highest-grossing movie of 2005?

A . War of the Worlds

B . Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith

C . Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

D . The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe 

Answer : Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

RELATED : The Most Popular Movie the Year You Were Born

92nd Annual Academy Awards - Show

Which actress has the most Oscar wins?

A . Katharine Hepburn

B . Meryl Streep

C . Ingrid Bergman

D . Elizabeth Taylor

Answer : Katharine Hepburn

When was the first Mission: Impossible movie released?

Answer : 1996

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire Dancing

How many movies did Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers do together?

Answer : 10

Bonus fact : They were first cast together in the 1933 movie Flying Down to Rio .

Who voices Lenny the shark in 2004’s Shark Tale ?

A . Adam Sandler

B . Will Ferrell

C . Jack Black

D . Jimmy Fallon

Answer : Jack Black

What movie is this famous quote from: “You can’t handle the truth!”

A . Training Day

B . Saving Private Ryan

C . A Few Good Men

D . Armageddon

Answer : A Few Good Men

Netflix's "6 Underground" New York Premiere

Which romantic movie does not feature Ryan Reynolds?

A . The Proposal

B . Definitely, Maybe

C . Just Friends 

D . He’s Just Not That Into You

Answer : He’s Just Not That Into You

Which character in The Godfather is nicknamed “The Turk”?

A . Emilio Barzini

B . Sonny Corleone

C . Virgil Sollozzo

D . Salvatore Tessio

Answer : Virgil Sollozzo

Which comedian makes a zombie cameo in Zombieland ?

A . Dan Aykroyd

B . Chevy Chase

C . Steve Martin

D . Bill Murray

Answer : Bill Murray

Fredric March And Janet Gaynor In 'A Star Is Born'

How many times has A Star is Born, which was originally released in 1937 , been remade?

A . 2 times

B . 3 times

C . 4 times

D . 5 times

Answer : 4 times

Bonus fact : Here is the list of remakes: The 1951 television adaptation starring Kathleen Crowley and Conrad Nagel, the 1954 movie starring Judy Garland and James Mason, the 1976 movie starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, and the 2018 movie starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper.

Which actress plays Julia Child in Julia & Julia ?

A . Meryl Streep

B . Diane Keaton

C . Jane Fonda

D . Joan Cusack

Answer : Meryl Streep

RELATED : 15 Must-Watch Movies That Will Make You Want to Cook

Winona Ryder in "The House of the Spirits"

Which movie does not feature Winona Ryder?

B . What’s Eating Gilbert Grape

C . Bram Stoker’s Dracula

D . Girl, Interrupted

Answer : What’s Eating Gilbert Grape

Which movie does not star Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore?

A . The Wedding Singer

B . Fever Pitch

C . Blended

D . 50 First Dates

Answer : Fever Pitch

Bonus fact : Barrymore actually does star in 2005’s Fever Pitch , but she stars opposite of Jimmy Fallon.

On the set of Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back

True or false: Han Solo’s classic “I know” line in Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back was improvised by Harrison Ford

What was tyler perry’s first movie as madea.

A . Madea’s Family Reunion 

B . Meet The Browns

C . Diary of a Mad Black Woman

D . Madea Goes To Jail

Answer : Diary of a Mad Black Woman

In Passengers , Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt star as voyagers to a new planet who awaken decades too early in their trip. Why does Lawrence’s character wake up?

A . Her hibernation pod malfunctions

B . The captain of the ship wakes her up so she can participate in an experiment with Pratt’s character

C . Pratt’s character wakes her up because he wants a companion

D . She has a medical emergency

Answer : Pratt’s character wakes her up because he wants a companion

Which phrase completes this famous quote from The Princess Bride : “Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. ______.”

A . “And now, you will pay.”

B . “Face me now, coward.”

C . “Prepare to die.”

D . “Tell me, why?”

Answer : “Prepare to die.”

RELATED : Can You Guess the Movies That Made These Quotes Famous?

On the set of The Nightmare Before Christmas

Around how long did it take to make The Nightmare Before Christmas ?

A . Two years

B . Three years

C . Five years

D . Six years

Answer : Three years

Don’t forget to test your holiday film knowledge with these Christmas movie trivia questions .

What’s the name of the planet Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker duel on in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith ?

B . Mustafar

D . Tatooine

Answer : Mustafar

RELATED : How to Watch the Star Wars Movies in Order

Where was The Notebook filmed?

A . Savannah, Georgia

B . Wilmington, North Carolina

C . Richmond, Virginia

D . Charleston, South Carolina

Answer : Charleston, South Carolina

So, how many did you get right? If you want to keep the trivia train going, test your knowledge with this book trivia quiz .

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movie jaws facts

Jaws 3-D (1983)

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  4. Jaws (1975)

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  1. 21 random facts about 'Jaws'

    Here's a roundup of 21 salient and strange facts about the movie. 1. Spielberg, whose first film, "Duel," was about a highway motorist being menaced by a mysterious tanker truck, was afraid of...

  2. 'Jaws' Trivia: 20 Facts You Might Not Know About the Movie

    Forty-five years ago this weekend, Jaws — the world's first summer blockbuster — hit America's movie screens and quickly became the highest grossing film of all time (for a while). Who doesn't think, when scanning the ocean before a dip, that unforgettable line: "Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water ..."

  3. 25 Incisive Facts About 'Jaws'

    Jaws was the first movie released in more than 400 theaters in the United States, and the first movie to gross over $100 million at the box office. It was the highest grossing movie of all...

  4. 45 Mindblowing Facts About Jaws

    The Brody's dog in Jaws, is Elmer and was Steven Spielberg's dog. Jaws Author, Peter Benchley, had a cameo in the film as a news reporter on the beach. Bruce the mechanical shark was named after Steven Spielberg's lawyer, Bruce Ramer. The original shooting schedule for Jaws was 58 days, it ballooned to 159. Jaws was nominated for four Oscars.

  5. 12 Jaws Behind-The-Scenes Facts You Might Not Know

    Earlier this year, Jaws celebrated its 45th anniversary. Once meant to be a simple man vs. shark movie based on a paperback novel, this early Steven Spielberg movie became the highest...

  6. 20 facts you might not know about Jaws

    Steven Spielberg's breakout film found critical acclaim and also a ton of commercial success. If you have only seen "Jaws" once or dozens of times - or perhaps never seen it before but just know...

  7. Jaws (film)

    In the New England beach town of Amity Island, a young woman, Chrissie Watkins, goes skinny dipping in the ocean one evening during a beachside party. While she is treading water, an unseen force attacks her and pulls her under the water. The next day, her partial remains are found on shore.

  8. Jaws

    Below are some fun (and not-so-fun) facts about the hugely popular 1970s film. Jaws Released 1. Jaws was supposed to be released during the holiday season of 1974, a traditionally strong time of the year for the biggest movies to come out.

  9. 30 Fun And Interesting Facts About Jaws

    Jaws is a 1975 American thriller movie directed by Steven Spielberg and based on Peter Benchley's 1974 novel of the same name. In the movie, a giant man-eating great white shark attacks beachgoers on Amity Island, a fictional New England summer resort town, prompting the local police chief to hunt it with the help of a marine biologist and a professional shark hunter.

  10. Jaws: 10 Facts About The Shark They Leave Out In The Movies

    In Jaws: The Revenge, the shark is attacking Chief Brody's family. This isn't typical shark behavior; they'll typically only attack humans to get them to leave their area, not eat them. IT'S ABOUT A FAMILY SEEKING REVENGE Sharks will occasionally interact with other fish, but they're reclusive creatures.

  11. Jaws (1975)

    Jaws opened on June 20, 1975. It was supposed to be released in theaters for Christmas 1974, but because filming ran way over the shooting schedule, its release was pushed back to summer the following year. Back in 1975, summer was traditionally when the worst movies were dumped into theatres as Americans typically enjoyed the outdoors instead.

  12. 'Jaws' Trivia: 20 Facts You Might Not Know About the Movie

    6. The shark was named Bruce. Most Jaws aficionados might already know that the three different versions of the 1.2-ton, mechanically powered predator created for the film (this was long before computer-generated imagery, or CGI, remember) were all nicknamed "Bruce" by Spielberg after his lawyer, Bruce Ramer.But how many fans know that the other thing the crew was known to call the faux ...

  13. 10 Surprising Facts About the Movie "Jaws"

    Jaws is a film that contains a scene of a man being brutally eaten alive by a shark while screaming (fun fact: the actor supposedly broke his leg during that scene so the screams of pain you hear are real), people having the limbs shorn off, and the most iconic jump scare in cinema history.

  14. 15 Things You Didn't Know About The Making Of Jaws

    Jaws is the movie of an accomplished, seasoned, and experienced director. Which makes it all the more amazing to consider that Steven Spielberg was only 27 throughout filming. Jaws was filmed from May to October of 1974. Spielberg was born on December 18, 1946, meaning he was just shy of 28 years old when filming wrapped in October.

  15. 9 Shark Facts That Movies Got Wrong, According to an Expert

    So when Martin Brody, the protagonist in the 1975 classic "Jaws, " is stabbing the nose of the animatronic monster, he may not be doing much good. The soft underbelly is the best target A...

  16. 151 Jaws Trivia Questions (And Answers) That Are Razor Sharp

    'Jaws', 1975, is an American horror/ thriller movie. The film, directed by Steven Spielberg, is an adaptation of the novel by Peter Benchley's 'Jaws'. It is one of the highest-grossing films in the history of cinema. The plot depicts the story of a trio who sets out to kill the great white who has been attacking beachgoers.

  17. Can You Ace This "Jaws" Quiz?

    In fact, the movie almost made back its production costs in the first weekend. "Jaws" pushed movie boundaries in several ways, mainly in its use of suspense. However, the technique Spielberg used in the movie wasn't intentional, but rather the result of those crazy mechanical sharks.

  18. 142 Jaws Trivia Questions & Answers

    Answer: Chief Brody. Brody says this after Harry declares, "We know all about you Chief. You don't go in the water at all, do you?" It is also mentioned by Brody's wife, Ellen, that he sits in his car while riding the ferry. Brody says at one point in the film that "drowning" is his fear. "That's some bad hat, Harry" is a soundbite for Bad Hat ...

  19. 13 Jaws Trivia Quizzes

    Average. 417myrtle. 9137 plays. 8. "Jaws" (1975) - You're Gonna Need a Bigger Quote - 10 questions - 4 mins. All the famous quotes from the movie have been covered in another quiz, so this quiz may be a little more challenging for you. Have fun and thanks for reading! Average.

  20. 10 Jaws Facts You Never Knew

    Jaws is one of the all-time classic blockbusters that started it all. Swimming around, we found some facts about Steven Spielberg's movie you never knew. We're gonna need a bigger budget....

  21. 100 Best Movie Trivia Questions (with Answers) [2022]

    C. The royale with cheese scene. D. The Ezekiel 25:17 scene. Answer: Mia's overdose scene. Bonus fact: When Uma Thurman's character is having an overdose, it looks like John Travolta sticks a ...

  22. Jaws 3-D (1983)

    Titled "National Lampoon's Jaws 3, People 0", it was about a movie studio trying to make a second sequel to Jaws (1975). It opened with author Peter Benchley being eaten in his pool by a shark, and included a naked Bo Derek and shark-costumed aliens. Joe Dante was attached as director.